20 Engaging Eclipse Activities for Middle School

The total solar eclipse that took place in August 2017 sparked a newfound interest in science among middle school students. Taking advantage of this enthusiasm, educators can use the eclipse as a means of engaging students in learning activities that are sure to excite and educate them. Here are 20 engaging eclipse activities that are perfect for middle school classrooms.

1. Create an eclipse diorama. Have students create a 3D model of the eclipse and its phases. Ask them to include the sun, moon, and Earth, as well as labels and arrows to show the movements of the different celestial bodies.

2. Make a timeline of the eclipse. Have students mark off the different phases of the eclipse, such as the partial eclipse, the total eclipse, and the end of totality. Ask them to research the exact dates and times of these phases.

3. Learn about the science of eclipses.
Have students research the science behind eclipses and explain their mechanics to the class in a presentation.

4. Write a poem about the eclipse. Ask students to write a poem about the eclipse and its phases. Encourage them to use vivid language and imagery to bring the experience of the eclipse to life.

5. Create a comic strip about the eclipse. Ask students to create a comic strip depicting the different phases of the eclipse. They can use online tools to easily draw and color the comic strip.

6. Design eclipse themed t-shirts. Have students design t-shirts that feature the eclipse. Ask them to include quotations and other details about the eclipse.

7. Make a model of the Earth, Sun, and Moon. Ask students to construct a model of the Earth, Sun, and Moon that shows the eclipse. Encourage them to include labels and arrows that illustrate the movements of each celestial body during the eclipse.

8. Write a story about the eclipse. Have students write a narrative that features the eclipse in some way. Ask them to include characters, setting, plot, and other elements to make the story compelling.

9. Research the next total solar eclipse. Have students research the next total solar eclipse and report on its expected timing and location.

10. Create a video about the eclipse. Ask students to create a video about the eclipse. They can use video editing software to assemble the footage and add music or other sound effects.

11. Design an eclipse booklet. Have students create a booklet that explains the eclipse, its phases, and other relevant information. Ask them to include diagrams and illustrations to make the booklet attractive and informative.

12. Take pictures of the eclipse. Ask students to take pictures of the eclipse through a telescope or camera. Encourage them to capture the different phases of the eclipse.

13. Make a map of the eclipse. Have students create a map that shows the path of the eclipse and the locations of the different phases. Ask them to research the exact locations of these phases.

14. Create a song about the eclipse. Ask students to write a song about the eclipse. They can use a music editing program to compose the music and record the lyrics.

15. Make a mobile of the eclipse. Have students construct a mobile that features the sun, moon, and Earth. Ask them to include labels and arrows to illustrate the movements of each celestial body during the eclipse.

16. Write a news report about the eclipse. Ask students to write a news report about the eclipse. Encourage them to include quotes from people who witnessed the eclipse and to provide other relevant information.

17. Research a historical eclipse. Have students research a historical eclipse and report on its timing, location, and impact.

18. Create a photo slideshow of the eclipse. Ask students to create a slideshow of the eclipse that includes their own photos as well as photos from other sources.

19. Make an eclipse project board. Have students construct a project board that features information about the eclipse. Ask them to include diagrams, photos, and other relevant information.

20. Write a letter to someone about the eclipse. Ask students to write a letter to someone about the eclipse. Encourage them to include personal anecdotes, observations, and reflections in their letter.

These engaging eclipse activities are sure to pique the interest of middle school students. Educators can incorporate these activities into their lesson plans to introduce students to the wonders of the eclipse.

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