Activities to Teach Students to Identify Appeals to Ethos, Pathos, and Logos in Advertisements

Advertising is a powerful tool that leverages persuasive strategies to engage the target audience and convince them to buy a product or service. Advertisements use various strategies to create an emotional connection and appeal to the audience’s values and beliefs. Three of the most common strategies used in advertisements are ethos, pathos, and logos. These strategies appeal to the audience’s credibility, emotion, and logic, respectively. Teaching students to identify these appeals in advertisements is a crucial skill that will help them become informed and discerning consumers. In this article, we will discuss some activities to teach students how to identify appeals to ethos, pathos, and logos.

1. Ethos

Ethos appeals to the credibility of a person, institution, or brand. For example, a celebrity endorsing a product is an appeal to ethos. To teach students about ethos, you can ask them to analyze advertisements featuring celebrities, experts, or well-known brands. Ask them to identify the reasons why the advertisement uses these endorsements. What makes these people or institutions credible? What values or beliefs do they represent? You can also ask students to research the reputation of these brands, celebrities, or institutions to see if their claims can be trusted.

2. Pathos

Pathos appeals to emotions such as fear, happiness, anger, or empathy, to create a connection with the audience. For example, an advertisement for a charity may use images of starving children to elicit empathy and persuade the audience to donate. To teach students about pathos, you can show them advertisements that use images or music to evoke emotions. Ask them to identify the emotions that the advertisement is trying to evoke. What is the message behind the advertisement? Is it effective? You can also ask them to create their own advertisements that use pathos to appeal to a specific emotion or belief.

3. Logos

Logos appeals to logic and reason, using facts, statistics, and logical arguments to persuade the audience. For example, an advertisement for a car may use fuel efficiency statistics to persuade consumers that the car is economical. To teach students about logos, you can ask them to analyze advertisements that use logic and reasoning. Ask them to identify the facts and statistics used in the advertisement. Are these facts and statistics accurate? Do they support the advertisement’s claims? You can also ask them to create their own advertisements that use logical reasoning to persuade the audience.

In conclusion, teaching students to identify appeals to ethos, pathos, and logos in advertisements is an essential skill that will help them become informed and discerning consumers. These activities will help students understand the persuasive strategies used in advertisements and how they can be used to manipulate consumers. By teaching students to think critically about advertisements, we can empower them to make informed purchasing decisions and become more responsible consumers.

Choose your Reaction!