Pedagogue Blog

21 Strategies to Help Learners Learn to Copy Content

Are you looking for strategies to help students learn to copy content? If so, keep reading.

1. Let the student have periods of rest to avoid eye fatigue.

2. Assess the appropriateness of giving the student tasks that require copying at a close proximity if the student’s capacity and ability make it impossible to finish the tasks.

3. Designate shorten tasks that can be quickly and accurately copied. As the student shows success, slowly increase the length of tasks.

4. Support the student with copying information. As the student shows success, slowly decrease the assistance, and require the student to assume more responsibility.

5. Show the student what they are doing wrong (e.g., hurrying just to get things done), and what they must be doing (e.g., carefully finishing work). For example: The student is hurrying through copying tasks. Tell them that they are hurrying and need to slow down and carefully copy the content to finish the tasks correctly.

6. Get the student to copy small amounts of content (e.g., a sentence or line) at a time.

7. Modify the format of the learning materials from which the student copies (e.g., have less content on a page, remove or cover images on pages, enlarge the print, etc.).

8. Inspect what the student has copied from the smartboard, textbook, etc., for accuracy. Working quickly is acceptable if the student performs the task accurately.

9. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too easy, (b) if the task is too complicated, and (c) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

10. Take into account the student’s capacity and ability level and experience before expecting them to finish copying tasks on their own.

11. Urge the student to monitor their neatness. Awareness should lessen the production of poor quality work.

12. Urge the student to create a 30-second definition of their goal to help them remain on-task and focus (e.g., “I will copy this sentence perfectly. The better I focus and remain on-task, the better I will perform.”).

13. Make sure that the student has only those learning materials appropriate for copying (e.g., pencil, pen, paper, etc.) on their desk.

14. Create a timeline for finishing a project. Expect the student to meet each deadline to finish the project on time.

15. Create rules for finishing tasks (e.g., have the student to ask for help when necessary, proofread content copied from the board, textbook, etc.). These rules should be consistent and followed by everyone in the classroom. Talk about the rules often.

16. Assess the level of task difficulty to ascertain whether the student will require additional time, assistance, etc., to copy written information.

17. Assess the visual and auditory stimuli in the classroom and remove or lessen the unnecessary environmental stimuli.

18. Provide recognition for quality work (e.g., display the student’s work, congratulate the student, etc.).

19. Use in an assortment of ways for the student to acquire information without copying it (e.g., teacher-made content, commercially produced content, photocopy of the content, etc.).

20. Provide the student a short break while they are working on monotonous tasks to relieve restlessness and improve concentration.

21. Consider using one of the apps on one of our best writing apps lists:

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 31 Grammar & Writing Apps, Tools & Resources

Ten Apps to Help Learners Develop Writing Skills

10 of the Best Grammar and Writing Apps for Elementary School Learners

11 of the Best Grammar and Writing Apps for High School Learners

10 of the Best Grammar and Writing Apps for Middle School Learners

23 Hacks to Help Learners Improve Their Handwriting

Are you looking for hacks to help students improve their handwriting? If so, keep reading.

1. Utilize adhesive content (e.g., tape, rubber cement, etc.) to keep paper positioned properly for handwriting.

2. Utilize a pencil grip (e.g., three-sided foam rubber, etc.) to give the student assistance in appropriate positioning of the pencil or pen.

3. Utilize handwriting models with arrows that indicate the direction in which the student should correctly form the letters.

4. Give older students with functional handwriting chances (e.g., job application forms, reinforcer surveys, order forms, checks to write, etc.).

5. Make sure that all educators who work with the student keep consistent expectations of handwriting quality.

6. Make sure the student has a number line and alphabet strip on their desk to use as a reference for the correct formation of letters and numbers to reduce errors.

7. Make sure the student knows that work not done neatly must be redone.

8. Give the student shorter tasks, but more of them throughout the day (e.g., four tasks of five problems each rather than one task of 20 problems).

9. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to rush and perform work in a careless manner.

10. Tasks not finished according to teacher instructions and expectations must be finished during leisure or break time.

11. Get the student to record the number of times their handwriting is acceptable during a given week.

12. Utilize a pencil grip or various-sized pencil to assist the student with fine motor skills to produce acceptable handwriting.

13. Inspect the student’s grip on the pencil to make sure that they are holding the pencil correctly.

14. Designate a peer to model acceptable work for the student to mimic.

15. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too easy, (b) if the task is too complicated, and (c) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

16. Connect with the parents to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for improving the quality of their handwriting at school.

17. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., improving the quality of their handwriting) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

18. Praise the student for improving the quality of handwriting based on capacity and ability. As the student shows success, slowly increase the amount of improvement expected for reinforcement.

19. Praise those students in the classroom who turn in tasks that are legible.

20. Create classroom rules: • Complete every assignment. • Complete assignments quietly. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

21. Talk with the student to explain: (a) what the student is doing wrong (e.g., turning in work that has spelling errors or spacing errors, work that is illegible, etc.) and (b) what they must be doing (e.g., taking time to check for spelling, spacing errors, etc.).

22. Praise efforts to improve handwriting (e.g., double-checking spelling, proper positioning of letters, correct spacing, etc.): (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

23. Consider using one of the apps on one of our best writing apps lists:

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 31 Grammar & Writing Apps, Tools & Resources

Ten Apps to Help Learners Develop Writing Skills

10 of the Best Grammar and Writing Apps for Elementary School Learners

11 of the Best Grammar and Writing Apps for High School Learners

10 of the Best Grammar and Writing Apps for Middle School Learners

21 Strategies to Help Learners Whose Writing Is Illegible

Are you looking for strategies to help students whose writing is illegible? If so, keep reading.

1. Let the student perform schoolwork in a quiet space (e.g., study carrel, library, resource room, etc.) to lessen distractions.

2. Give the student shorter tasks while increasing the quality of expectations.

3. Observe the student while they are performing schoolwork to monitor handwriting quality.

4. Give the student clearly stated criteria for acceptable work.

5. Get the student to read/go over schoolwork with the teacher so that the student can become aware of the quality of their work.

6. Give the student samples of work to serve as models for acceptable quality (e.g., the student is to match the quality of the sample before turning in the task).

7. Give the student additional time to perform schoolwork to achieve quality.

8. Teach the student procedures for doing quality work (e.g., listen to instructions, make sure instructions are grasped, work at an acceptable pace, check for errors, correct for neatness, copy the work over, etc.).

9. Recognize quality work (e.g., display the student’s work, congratulate the student, etc.).

10. Organize a preliminary evaluation of the work. Require the student to make appropriate corrections before final grading.

11. Create levels of expectations for quality handwriting performance. Require the student to correct or repeat tasks until the expectations are met.

12. Give the student quality learning materials to perform tasks (e.g., pencil with eraser, paper, dictionary, handwriting sample, etc.).

13. Give the student ample chance to master handwriting skills (e.g., instruction in letter positioning, direction, spacing, etc.).

14. Give the student an appropriate model of handwriting (e.g., other students’ work, teacher samples, commercial samples, etc.) to use at their desks.

15. Exhibit appropriate handwriting at all times.

16. Give a multitude of handwriting chances for the student to practice handwriting skills (e.g., writing letters to sports and entertainment figures, relatives, or friends; writing for free information on a topic in which the student is interested, etc.).

17. Get the student to trace handwriting models. Fade the models as the student develops the skill.

18. Slowly lessen the space between lines as the student’s handwriting improves.

19. Utilize primary paper to assist the student in sizing uppercase and lowercase letters. Utilize standard-lined paper when the student’s skills improve.

20. Utilize lined paper that is also vertically lined to teach the student appropriate spacing skills.

21. Consider using one of the apps on one of our best writing apps lists:

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 31 Grammar & Writing Apps, Tools & Resources

Ten Apps to Help Learners Develop Writing Skills

10 of the Best Grammar and Writing Apps for Elementary School Learners

11 of the Best Grammar and Writing Apps for High School Learners

10 of the Best Grammar and Writing Apps for Middle School Learners

15 Ways to Teach Kids to Find Supporting Details While Reading

Are you looking for ways to teach kids to find supporting details while reading? If so, keep reading.

1. Give practice in identifying the supporting details by using an app that gives the student instant feedback.

2. Make sure the student has mastery of reading ideas at each level before introducing a new skill level.

3. Make sure the student is not required to learn more information than they are capable of learning at any time.

4. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to hurry and commit errors.

5. Minimize the amount of information on a page if it is causing visual distractions for the student (e.g., have less print to read, isolate information that is presented to the student, etc.).

6. Spotlight essential information the student reads (e.g., instructions, tasks, etc.).

7. Separate at several points during the presentation of information to check the student’s comprehension.

8. Minimize the amount of content the student reads at one time (e.g., lessen reading content to individual sentences or one paragraph, etc.). As the student experiences success, slowly increase the amount of content.

9. Compose paragraphs and short stories requiring skills the student is presently developing. The passages must be of interest to the student using their name, family members, friends, pets, and exciting experiences.

10. Make sure that the reading requirements of all subjects and tasks are within the capacity and ability level of the student. If not, modify or adjust the reading content to the student’s capacity and ability level.

11. Utilize reading sequence learning materials with high interest (e.g., adventure, romances, mysteries, athletics, etc.) and low vocabulary.

12. Provide the student time to read a selection more than once, emphasizing comprehension rather than speed.

13. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

14. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

15. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

15 Strategies to Help Learners Who Have Trouble Identifying Supporting Details While Reading

Are you looking for strategies to help students who have trouble identifying supporting details while reading? If so, keep reading.

1. Get the student to find the main idea of each paragraph. Then have the student list all information from the paragraph that relates to the main idea.

2. Teach the student mapping techniques to find supporting details.

3. Give the student a diagram in which supporting details are like the legs of a bug. The student can learn to make “bug notes” in this way: An oval shape is the bug’s body on which the teacher writes the main idea of a paragraph. Then each supporting detail is written on a line coming out from the oval. These represent the bug’s legs. The number of legs each bug has depends on the number of supporting details there are for a given topic.

4. Get the student to pretend to be a detective and play the game Prove It. After reading a selection, the main idea is determined and written on the smartboard. The student must “prove it” by telling the supporting details that were discovered in the reading selection.

5. Praise the student for identifying supporting details: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

6. Converse with the student to explain: (a) what the student is doing wrong and (b) what the student should be doing.

7. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for discovering supporting details at school.

8. Get the student to question any directions, explanations, and instructions not grasped.

9. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too complicated and (b) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

10. Select a peer to model discovering supporting details for the student and to assist the student with instructions, etc.

11. Indicate what is to be done for the conclusion of the task (e.g., indicate definite starting and stopping points, indicate minimum requirements, etc.).

12. Get the student to be a peer tutor to teach another student a concept they have learned.

13. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

14. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

15. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

16 Ways to Help Learners Improve Their Glossary and Dictionary Skills

Are you looking for ways to help students improve their glossary and dictionary skills? If so, keep reading.

1. Praise the student for demonstrating knowledge of glossary and/or dictionary skills: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

2. Converse with the student to explain (a) what the student is doing wrong and (b) what the student should be doing.

3. Praise the student for demonstrating knowledge of glossary skills and/or dictionary skills based on the number of times the student can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the number of times required for reinforcement.

4. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for demonstrating glossary and dictionary skills at school.

5. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too complicated and (b) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

6. Select a peer to model glossary and dictionary skills for the student and to assist the student with instructions, etc.

7. Get the student to be a peer tutor to teach another student a concept they have learned.

8. Provide practice in glossary and/or dictionary skills by using an app that gives the student instant feedback.

9. Make sure the student has mastery of ideas at each level before introducing a new skill level.

10. Make sure the student is not required to learn more information than they are capable of at any time.

11. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to hurry and commit errors.

12. Give the student an increased chance for help or assistance on academic tasks (e.g., peer tutoring, instructions for work sent home, frequent interactions, etc.).

13. Daily, examine those skills, ideas, tasks, etc., that have been previously introduced.

14. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

15. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

16. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

16 Strategies to Help Learners Who Do Not Possess Glossary and Dictionary Skills

Are you looking for strategies to help students who do not possess glossary and dictionary skills? If so, keep reading.

1. Give the student a dictionary. Name a word and have the student look up the word in the dictionary using the guide words at the top of each page. Time the student and see if their best time can be beaten.

2. Make sure the student has a comprehension of how to use guide words at the top of the dictionary page.

3. Make sure the student main idea words to the first, second, third, etc., letter.

4. Make sure the student understands the reasons for using a dictionary or glossary (e.g., to look up the meanings of words, to look up how to spell words, to look up the connect pronunciation of words, etc.).

5. Make sure the student understands that the glossary is located in the back of the book.

6. Make sure the student is using a dictionary that is on their reading level.

7. Make sure the student main idea.

8. Assign the student words to look up in his/her textbook glossary. Begin with easier words and add words with more complicated spellings and definitions as the student shows success.

9. Get the student to find the target word of a paragraph, sentence, story, etc., and look it up in the glossary of the book.

10. Get the student to choose words from a spelling list and write a story using those words. Then have the student make a glossary to attach to the end of the story with decoding words shown in images.

11. Get the student to compare a glossary from a textbook with a student-level thesaurus for school by building a glossary of their own vocabulary.

12. Get the student to question any directions, explanations, or instructions not grasped.

13. Get the student to review the words in a textbook glossary and determine why those particular words were selected to be in the glossary and more commonly used words were not selected.

14. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

15. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

16. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

21 Strategies to Help Learners Who Do Not Understand Contractions and Compound Words

Are you looking for strategies to help students who do not understand contractions and compound words? If so, keep reading.

1. Get the student to find the words that are used to make the most common contractions they use (e.g., can’t, won’t, wouldn’t, etc.).

2. Give the student a list of the most common contractions and compound words with the corresponding words from which they are created. Let the student keep the list at their desk as a reference.

3. Get the student to make their own dictionary of contractions and compound words with the corresponding words from which they are created.

4. Include a contraction and/or compound word in each week’s spelling list for the student to learn.

5. Teach the student how compound words are made by writing two words on construction paper and sliding them together.

6. Get the student to be a peer tutor to teach another student a concept they have learned. This can serve as reinforcement for the student.

7. Give practice in compound words and contractions by using a computer program that gives the student instant feedback.

8. Make sure the student is not required to learn more information than they are capable of learning at any time.

9. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to hurry and commit errors.

10. Get the student to question any directions, explanations, and instructions not grasped.

11. Give the student an increased chance for help or assistance on academic tasks (e.g., peer tutor, instructions for work sent home, frequent interactions, etc.).

12. Praise the student for beginning, staying on, and finishing tasks.

13. Get the student to practice a new skill or task alone or with an aide, the teacher, or a peer before the entire group attempts the learning experience or before performing for a grade.

14. Present compound words and contractions and their meanings to the student before they read new content. These may be entered in a “vocabulary” notebook kept by the student.

15. Praise the student for demonstrating knowledge of compound words and contractions: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

16. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for improved comprehension of contractions and compound words at school.

17. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too complicated and (b) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

18. Select a peer to model comprehension of contractions and compound words for the student and to assist the student with instructions, etc.

19. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

20. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

21. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

16 Ways to Teach Learners to Find the Main Idea and Topic Sentence of a Story

Are you looking for ways to teach students to find the main idea and topic sentence of the story? If so, keep reading.

1. Get the student to be a peer tutor to teach another student a concept they have learned. This can serve as reinforcement for the student.

2. Give practice in identifying the topic sentence and/or the main idea using an app that gives the student instant feedback.

3. Make sure the student has mastery of reading ideas at each level before introducing a new skill level.

4. Make sure the student is not required to learn more information than they are capable of learning at any time.

5. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to hurry and commit errors.

6. Minimize the amount of information on a page if it is causing visual distractions for the student (e.g., have less print to read, isolate information that is presented to the student).

7. Spotlight essential information the student reads (e.g., instructions, tasks, etc.).

8. Provide the student time to read a selection more than once, emphasizing comprehension rather than speed.

9. Separate at several points during the presentation of information to check the student’s comprehension.

10. Utilize reading sequence learning materials with high interest (e.g., adventures, romances, my stories, athletics, etc.) and low vocabulary.

11. Compose paragraphs and short stories requiring skills the student is presently developing. The passages must be of interest to the student using their name, family members, friends, pets, and exciting experiences.

12. Make sure that the reading requirements of all subjects and tasks are within the capacity and ability level of the student. If not, modify or adjust the reading content to the student’s capacity and ability level.

13. Minimize the amount of content the student reads at one time (e.g., lessen reading content to individual sentences or one paragraph, etc.). As the student shows success, slowly increase the amount of content.

14. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

15. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

16. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

16 Strategies to Help Learners Who Have Trouble Finding the Main Idea and Topic Sentence

Are you looking for strategies to help students who have trouble finding the main idea and topic sentence? If so, keep reading.

1. Make sure the student knows that the first sentence of a paragraph should always be considered as a possible topic sentence and main idea.

2. Make sure the student knows that a topic sentence or main idea for a paragraph will always contain one or more of the following, that will be the whole idea of the paragraph: Who, What, Where, On occasions where, How.

3. Make sure the student knows that the topic sentence or main idea can be determined by choosing the one sentence in a paragraph that makes sense when it stands alone (e.g., in the process of elimination, isolate each sentence and decide if it tells what the whole paragraph is about).

4. Get the student to write a paragraph about a favorite topic and use a triangle to ascertain the hierarchy of sentences: (1) Most essential (theme), (2) Most essential detail, (3) Less essential detail, and ( 4) Incidental detail (e.g., could be left out without changing the paragraph meaning).

5. Get the student to use the “satellite system” to find the main idea of a paragraph. The student should select the one word or phrase around which the entire paragraph is built. Then the student should name the other details that describe that word or phrase. This allows the student to focus on the subject to spot the main idea.

6. Praise the student for identifying the topic sentence and/or the main idea: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

7. Converse with the student to explain (a) what the student is doing wrong and (b) what the student should be doing.

8. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

9. Get the student to question any directions, explanations, and instructions not grasped.

10. Connect with parents to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for correctly identifying topic sentences at school.

11. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too complicated and (b) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

12. Select a peer to model identifying topic sentences for the student and also to assist the student with instructions, etc.

13. Indicate what is to be done for the conclusion of the task (e.g., indicate definite starting and stopping points, indicate a minimum requirement, etc.).

14. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

15. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

16. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

19 Strategies to Help Learners Who Do Not Comprehend Alphabetical Order

Are you looking for strategies to help students who do not comprehend alphabetical order? If so, keep reading.

1. On occasions where lining up or dismissing the students, ask each student to tell the letter that comes next in alphabetical order. The students are dismissed as they correctly name each letter.

2. After students are proficient at telling “next” letters, try having students name “before” letters.

3. Using a small group, have one student begin saying the alphabet. On occasions where the teacher points to another student, the first student becomes quiet, and the second student starts saying the alphabet where the first student stopped.

4. Give the student an alphabet strip at their desk to use as a reference.

5. Get the student to say the alphabet as they point to each letter in alphabetical order.

6. Get the student to alphabetize 26 words, each beginning with various letters of the alphabet.

7. After the student has learned alphabetizing by the first letter of words, have the student alphabetize 26 words that begin with the same first letter but have each letter of the alphabet represented as the second letter (e.g., Aaron, able, acid, adapt, etc.).

8. Get the student to begin alphabetizing with only two words. Add a third word and so on as the student further develops a comprehension of alphabetical order.

9. Get the student to be a peer tutor to teach another student a concept they have learned.

10. Give practice in alphabetizing by using an app that gives the student instant feedback.

11. Make sure the student has mastery of alphabetizing ideas at each level before introducing a new skill level (e.g., alphabetizing to the first letter, second letter, third letter, etc.).

12. Make sure that the student is not required to learn more information than they are capable of learning at any time.

13. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to hurry and commit errors.

14. Daily, examine those skills, ideas, tasks, etc., that have been previously introduced.

15. Praise the student for alphabetizing: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.) for demonstrating comprehension of alphabetizing.

16. Converse with the student to explain: (a) what he/ she is doing wrong and (b) what they should be doing.

17. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too complicated and (b) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

18. Select a peer to model alphabetizing for the student and also to assist the student with instructions.

19. Get the student to practice a new skill or task alone or with an aide, the teacher, or a peer before the entire group attempts the learning experience or before performing for a grade.

20. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

15 Ways to Teach Kids Story Sequencing Skills

Are you looking for ways to teach students story sequencing skills? If so, keep reading.

1. Provide the student with time to read a selection more than once, emphasizing comprehension rather than speed.

2. Utilize reading sequence learning materials with high interest (e.g., adventures, romances, mysteries, athletics, etc.).

3. Compose notes and letters to the student to give reading content that they will want to read for comprehension. Learners should be urged to pen notes at the same time each week.

4. Compose paragraphs and short stories requiring skills the student is presently developing. The passages must be of interest to the students.

5. Make sure that the reading requirements of all subjects and tasks are within the capacity and ability level of the student. If not, modify or adjust the reading content to the student’s capacity and ability level. A lower-level text may be an alternative.

6. Get the student to practice a new skill or task alone or with an aide, the teacher, or a peer before the entire group attempts the learning experience or before performing for a grade.

7. Converse with the student to explain (a) what the student is doing wrong and (b) what the student should be doing.

8. Praise the student for sequencing: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.) for accurately demonstrating correct sequencing learning activities.

9. Connect with parents to disseminate information about the student’s progress. Parents may reinforce the student at home for improvements in sequencing activities at school.

10. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too complicated and (b) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

11. Select a peer to model sequencing of activities for the student and also to assist the student with instructions.

12. Let the student perform alternative versions of the tasks. As the student shows success, slowly introduce more components of the regular tasks until those can be delivered successfully.

16. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

17. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

18. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

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