Pedagogue Blog

18 Strategies to Teach Learners Be Ready for Learning Experiences

Are you looking for strategies to teach students to be prepared for learning experiences? If so, keep reading.

1. Praise the student for being ready for a learning experience at a specific time: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

2. Converse with the student to explain (a) what they are doing wrong (e.g., coming late/early to a learning experience) and (b) what they must be doing (e.g., arriving at a learning experience at a specific time).

3. Create classroom rules: • Come to class on time. • Complete every assignment. • Complete assignments quietly. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

4. Select a peer to model being ready for a learning experience at a specific time for the student.

5. Praise the student for arriving at a learning experience within a given period. As the student becomes more successful in being punctual, slowly lessen the duration of time the student has to take part in a learning experience.

6. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., coming to class on time, having appropriate learning materials, etc.) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

7. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for being ready for learning activities at a specific time at school.

8. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too easy, (b) if the task is too complicated, and (c) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

9. Provide the student a specific responsibility to be performed at the beginning of each learning experience to urge them to be on time.

10. Select a peer to escort the student to learning activities.

11. Make sure that the student’s daily schedule follows an established routine (schedule).

12. Restrict the number of interruptions in the student’s schedule.

13. Make sure the student has sufficient time to get to a learning experience.

14. Make sure that the student knows how to get from one learning experience to another.

15. Utilize a timer to help the student get to learning activities at specific times.

16. Praise those students in the classroom who are ready for all learning experiences at a specific time.

17. Give the student oral signals when it is time to change learning activities (e.g., “It is time for the red group to have reading.” “Now it is time for the red group to put away learning materials and move to the next learning experience.” etc.).

18. Consider using an education app to help the student sharpen their organizational skills. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22 Hacks to Encourage Learners Not to Leave Their Seat Without Permission

Are you looking for hacks to encourage students not to leave their seat without permission? If so, keep reading.

1. Create times when it is permissible for the student to be out of their seat (e.g., leave their seat only to get a book, only after obtaining permission, etc.).

2. Give the student a predetermined signal when they begin to leave their seat.

3. Make sure that reinforcement is not provided for unacceptable behavior(e.g., paying attention to the student only when they leave their seat).

4. Be proactive. Work with the school counselor to design a schedule conducive to the student’s success (e.g., have physical education scheduled the last period of the day, intersperse electives that allow greater freedom of movement with classes requiring expanded periods of concentration, etc.).

5. Refrain from placing the student in situations that require sitting for an expanded duration of time such as lectures, seminars, assemblies, etc. Give the information for the student through a recording or lecture notes.

6. Assess the visual and auditory stimuli in the classroom. Determine the number of stimuli the student can tolerate. Remove unnecessary stimuli from their surroundings.

7. Talk regularly with the student to prevent the student from leaving their seat.

8. Assess the appropriateness of tasks to ascertain (a) if the tasks are too easy, (b) if the tasks are too complicated, and (c) if the duration of time scheduled for the tasks is sufficient.

9. Be firm, fair, and consistent, expecting the student to remain seated. Do not let them get up and walk around one time and expect them to remain seated the next time.

10. Talk about your concerns regarding the student’s attention span and failure to remain seated with their family, a school official, etc., if it is interfering with their progress at school.

11. Get the student to perform one task at a time. Provide the student the chance for movement between learning activities.

12. Solidify on-task behavior by providing a full schedule of daily activities. Stop lag time from happening when the student would be free to leave their seat.

13. Teach the student to use techniques such as crossing their arms and legs, clinching their fists, and webbing their hands when they feel the urge to leave their seat.

14. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., staying in their seat) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

15. Provide visibility to and from the student to keep their attention when oral questions/instructions are being delivered. The teacher and the student should be able to see each other at all times. Make eye contact possible at all times.

16. Connect with the student’s cooperative work experience/vocational education teacher to place the student on a job site allowing a high degree of physical movement.

17. Restrict the amount of time you expect the student to be seated to perform tasks and tasks. Do not initially give them things to do that take more than 10–15 minutes to finish.

18. Find the situations in which the student is most likely to participate in unacceptable behavior and fail to remain seated. After you have identified these situations, think of ways to minimize their occurrence.

19. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

20. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

21. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

22. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

21 Ways to Encourage Learners Not to Leave Their Seat Without Permission

Are you looking for ways to encourage students not to leave their seat without permission ? If so, keep reading.

1. Plan short learning activities for the student to perform while seated. As the student shows success staying in their seat, slowly increase the length of the learning activities.

2. Provide the student with frequent chances to leave their seat for appropriate reasons (e.g., getting learning materials, running errands, assisting the teacher, etc.).

3. Talk with the student to explain(a) what they are doing wrong (e.g., leaving seat without permission, etc.) and (b) what they must be doing (e.g., remaining in their seat, asking permission to leave their seat, etc.).

4. Create classroom rules: • Complete every assignment. • Complete assignments quietly. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

5. Make sure that the expectation for the student to remain seated is appropriate for their level of development and capacity and ability.

6. Urge the student to remind himself/herself to wait when they feel the urge to get out of their seat (e.g., “Stop. Count to 10.”).

7. Urge the student to self-monitor their behavior to decrease the need for teacher intervention to remain seated.

8. Talk regularly with the student to, keep their attention to the learning experience (e.g., ask the student questions, ask the student’s opinions, stand near the student, seat the student near the teacher’s desk, etc.).

9. Inform the student when needed to remain their seat.

10. Praise the student for staying in their seat: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., classroom privileges, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

11. Urge the student to take part in high energy learning activities after school that let them release excess energy (e.g., racquetball, soccer, etc.).

12. Give the student frequent chances to participate, take a turn, etc., to keep them involved in a learning experience.

13. Stop the student from becoming overstimulated by a learning experience(e.g., frustrated, angry, excited, etc.).

14. Place the student near the teacher.

15. Separate the student from the peer who stimulates their unacceptable behavior.

16. Give the student the most attractive and exciting learning activities possible.

17. Give the student a calm, quiet environment in which to work.

18. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

19. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

20. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

21. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

21 Strategies to Encourage Learners Not to Leave Their Seat Without Permission

Are you looking for strategies to encourage students not to leave their seat without permission? If so, keep reading.

1. Connect with the student’s parents to disseminate information about the student’s appropriate behavior. The parents may reinforce the student at home for staying in their seat at school.

2. Allow the student a break while working on monotonous tasks to relieve restlessness and improve concentration.

3. Urge the student to say a mantra to themselves when entering a situation in which they have to sit for an expanded duration of time (e.g., be still, be still, be still).

4. Get the student to chart the duration of time they can remain in their seat.

5. Make sure the student knows when it is acceptable to leave their seat (e.g., in an emergency).

6. Make sure the student has all the appropriate learning materials assembled prior to beginning a project, task, etc., to lessen the need to leave their seat.

7. Give constant, positive reinforcement for appropriate behavior. Ignore as many unacceptable behaviors as possible.

8. Get the student to question any directions, explanations, or instructions they do not understand.

9. Allow some time for movement between tasks if the student appears to need a break.

10. Attempt several groupings in the classroom to ascertain the situation in which the student is most comfortable and remains seated without constant supervision.

11. Make the appropriate adjustments in their surroundings to prevent the student from experiencing stress, frustration, anger, etc., as much as possible, to decrease the student’s tendency to leave their seat.

12. Praise those students in the classroom who remain in their seats and ask permission to leave their seats.

13. Praise the student for staying in their seat based on the duration of time they can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for reinforcement.

14. Take the student away from the learning experience until they can remain their seat.

15. Give the student an easily grasped list of consequences for unacceptable behavior.

16. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to become overstimulated and leave their seat.

17. Select a peer to model staying in their seat for the student.

18. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

19. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

20. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

21. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

21 Ways to Encourage Learners Not to Talk During Quiet Time

Are you looking for ways to encourage students not to talk during quiet time? If so, keep reading.

1. Make the appropriate adjustments in their surroundings to prevent the student from experiencing stress, frustration, and anger.

2. Talk regularly with the student to lessen the need for them to talk to other students.

3. Provide visibility to and from the student to keep their attention when oral questions/instructions are being delivered. The teacher and the student should be able to see each other at all times. Make eye contact possible at all times.

4. Assess the appropriateness of the social situation concerning the student’s capacity and ability to function successfully.

5. Attempt several groupings to ascertain the situation in which the student is most comfortable.

6. Praise the student for raising their hand to be recognized.

7. Ask the student a question when they are most likely to be able to respond correctly (e.g., when discussing something in which the student is interested, when the teacher is sure they know the answer, etc.).

8. Teach the student to recognize when to speak, to know how much to say, and to make appropriate remarks (e.g., brief remarks, remarks within the context of the situation, remarks that are a follow-up to what has just been said, etc.).

9. Get the student to work in small groups in which they would have frequent chances to speak. As the student learns to wait longer for their turn to speak, slowly increase the size of the group.

10. Make sure that the student’s feelings are considered when it is appropriate to deal with their talking to other students (i.e., handle remarks in such a way as to not diminish the student’s enthusiasm for participation).

11. Urge the student to model the behavior of peers who are successful at not talking to others during quiet activity periods.

12. Assist the student in improving concentration skills (e.g., listening to the speaker, taking notes, preparing remarks in advance, making remarks in an appropriate context, etc.).

13. Get the student to question any directions, explanations, or instructions they do not understand prior to asking other students for information.

14. Provide directions, explanations, and instructions in a clear, concise manner to lessen the student’s need to ask other students for information.

15. Provide a predetermined signal (e.g., hand signal, oral signal, etc.) if the student talks to others during quiet activity periods.

16. After telling the student why they should not be talking, explain the reason.

17. Do not provide too much free time for the student.

18. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

19. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

20. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

21. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

22 Strategies to Teach Learners Not to Talk During Quiet Time

Are you looking for strategies to teach students not to talk during quiet time? If so, keep reading.

1. Praise the student for working quietly: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

2. Talk with the student to explain(a) what the student is doing wrong (e.g., talking to others during quiet activity periods) and (b) what the student should be doing (e.g., waiting until it is appropriate to speak, working quietly, etc.).

3. Create classroom rules: • Complete every assignment. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. • Raise your hand. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

4. Praise those students in the classroom who work quietly during learning experience periods.

5. Praise the student for working quietly based on the duration of time the student can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for reinforcement.

6. Take the student away from the learning experience until they can demonstrate appropriate behavior and self-control.

7. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., working quietly) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

8. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s appropriate behavior. The parents may reinforce the student at home for working quietly at school.

9. Get the student to be the leader of a cooperative learning experience if they possess a mastery of skills or an interest in that area.

10. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too easy, (b) if the task is too complicated, and (c) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

11. Make sure that reinforcement is not provided for unacceptable behavior(e.g., making unacceptable remarks, talking to others during quiet activity periods, etc.).

12. Provide the student sufficient chances to speak in the classroom, talk to other students, etc. (i.e., enthusiastic students need many chances to contribute).

13. Provide a predetermined signal (e.g., hand signal, oral signal, etc.) when the student begins to talk to other students during quiet time.

14. Show the student that they may be trying too hard to fit in and that they should relax, talk less, and talk at appropriate times.

15. Organize the student’s surroundings to limit chances for talking to other students during quiet activity periods (e.g., keep the student engaged in learning activities, have the student seated near the teacher, etc.).

16. Provide the student with duties in the classroom (e.g., running errands, chances to help the teacher, etc.).

17. Minimize learning activities that might be menacing to the student (e.g., announcing test score ranges or test scores aloud, making students read aloud in class, emphasizing the success of particular students, etc.).

18. Give the student many chances for social and academic success.

19. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

20. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

21. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

22. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

20 Hacks to Teach Learners Not to Interrupt Others

Are you looking for hacks to teach students not to interrupt others? If so, keep reading.

1. Be firm, fair, and consistent, expecting the student to behave appropriately. Do not Let the student interrupt one time and expect them not to interrupt the next time.

2. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., waiting for a turn to speak, working quietly, etc.) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

3. Always treat the student with the utmost respect. Talk objectively at all times.

4. Show the student when they interrupt that you are talking now, and they may talk to you in a few moments.

5. Do not criticize when correcting the student; be honest yet compassionate. Never cause the student to feel negatively about themselves.

6. Provide visibility to and from the student to keep their attention when oral questions/instructions are being delivered. The teacher and the student should be able to see each other at all times. Make eye contact possible at all times.

7. Place the student away from those students they are most likely to bother.

8. Teach the student appropriate ways to express needs to others (e.g., waiting for a turn, raising their hand, etc.).

9. Do not let the student use ADHD as an excuse. Hold the student responsible for their actions. However, understand how to accept the problems ADHD brings into the student’s life while they are learning to make accommodations.

10. Give students frequent chances to interact with one another (e.g., before and after school, between learning activities, etc.).

11. Provide the student with frequent chances to join conversations with others by allowing them time to talk, asking them to repeat an experience, etc.

12. Make sure that the student knows the relationship between unacceptable behavior and the consequences that follow (e.g., others ignoring him/her, hurting others’ feelings, etc.).

13. Show the student an appropriate way to get someone’s attention without interrupting.

14. Do not interrupt the student when they are doing something, talking to someone, etc.

15. Make sure the student knows when it is acceptable to interrupt others (e.g., in an emergency).

16. Place the student near the teacher.

17. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

18. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

19. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

20. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

25 Ways to Encourage Learners Not to Interrupt Others

Are you looking for ways to encourage students not to interrupt others? If so, keep reading.

1. Get the student to question any directions, explanations, or instructions before starting a task to reinforce comprehension and avoid interrupting peers later to ask questions.

2. Converse with the student to explain (a) what they are doing wrong and (b) what they must be doing (e.g., waiting for a turn to speak, working quietly, etc.).

3. Take the student away from the learning experience until they can demonstrate appropriate behavior and self-control.

4. Teach the student to ask themselves questions such as, “What should I be doing right now?” “Is what I have to say relevant to this topic?” “Is this an excellent time for me to comment?”

5. Urge the student to remind themselves to wait when they feel the urge to interrupt (e.g., “Stop. Count to 10.”).

6. Teach the student to use techniques such as crossing their and legs, clinching their fists, and webbing their hands when they feel the urge to interrupt.

7. Show the student the importance of treating people as they want to be treated (e.g., people will not interrupt you if you do not interrupt them).

8. Talk regularly with the student to keep their involvement in the learning experience (e.g., ask the student questions, ask the student’s opinion, stand near the student, seat the student near the teacher’s desk, etc.).

9. Show the student why it is essential not to interrupt others. Assist them in understanding that it is impolite, that they might hurt someone’s feelings, etc.

10. Get the student to make a list of consequences associated with regularly occurring behaviors (e.g., By disrupting others, they will be perceived as unmannerly. By behaving aggressively, the student will cause people to avoid him/her.).

11. Show the student the need to lessen impulsive behavior to increase work productivity and general happiness.

12. Make sure that you do not interrupt others. If you interrupt others, the student will continue to do so.

13. Create rules for conversing with others (e.g., wait for your turn to talk, stand quietly by the person with whom you want to talk until you are noticed, excuse yourself when you interrupt others, etc.). These rules should be consistent and followed by everyone in the class. Talk about the rules often.

14. Select a peer who does not interrupt others. Urge the student to observe that person and try to model the behaviors that Let them be patient.

15. Provide a predetermined signal (e.g., hand signal, oral signal, etc.) when the student begins to display unacceptable behaviors.

16. Practice continuously the class rules regarding talking aloud during quiet activity periods.

17. Teach appropriate social rituals (e.g., say, “Excuse me,” before interrupting; wait until someone stops speaking to begin talking, etc.).

18. Get the student to find the situations in which they are most likely to interrupt. After they have identified these situations, have them think of ways to minimize their occurrences.

19. Teach and practice efficient communication skills. These skills include listening, keeping eye contact, and positive body language.

20. Create classroom rules: • Complete every assignment. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. • Raise your hand. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

21. Get a peer to signal the student when they are interrupting others (e.g., the peer can touch the student’s arm or desk as a signal that they are interrupting).

22. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

23. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

24. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

25. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

23 Strategies to Teach Learners Not to Interrupt Others

Are you looking for strategies to teach students not to interrupt others? If so, keep reading.

1. Connect with the student’s parents to disseminate information about the student’s appropriate behavior. The parents may reinforce the student at home for not interrupting other students at school.

2. Urge the student to say a mantra to themselves when entering a situation where they may be inclined to interrupt (e.g., do not interrupt, do not interrupt, do not interrupt).

3. Train the student to carry a notepad with him/her at all times and to write information down to help them remember.

4. Teach yourself and others about ADHD to increase comprehension and accommodation of interruptive behavior.

5. Assist the student in realizing that all behavior has negative or positive consequences. Urge the student to practice behaviors that will lead to positive consequences.

6. Urge the student to create an understanding of themselves and those around him/her. Get the student to periodically step back and ask themselves, “Am I interrupting others?”

7. Urge the student to create an understanding of the consequences of their behavior by writing down or talking through problems that may happen due to interrupting others (e.g., perceived as unmannerly, avoided, etc.).

8. Take into account the student’s age and capacity and ability level carefully before expecting them not to interrupt others when they are talking, working, reading, etc.

9. Teach the student about ADHD and the need to self-monitor behavior.

10. Give constant, positive reinforcement for appropriate behavior. Ignore as many unacceptable behaviors as possible.

11. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., classroom privileges, passing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

12. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior (e.g., waiting for a turn to speak, working quietly, etc.) based on the duration of time the student can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for reinforcement.

13. Select a peer to model appropriate behavior for the student.

14. Urge the student to become aware of the times when they are most impulsive and likely to interrupt others (e.g., in a large group of people, when they are angry, etc.) and limit their interactions with others during these times.

15. Converse with the student before starting a learning experience and remind them of the importance of listening to others.

16. Praise those students in the classroom who wait for their turn to speak, do not interrupt others, work quietly, etc.

17. Give the student an easily grasped list of consequences for unacceptable behavior.

18. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to become anxious and interrupt others.

19. Teach the student to read signals from others (e.g., if they begin to interrupt a peer and that person continues to talk, realize that they are interrupting and stop talking; when there is silence in a class, it is not appropriate to fill the silence with remarks, etc.).

20. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

21. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

23. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

18 Genius Ways to Encourage Learners Not to Blurt Out Answers During Class

Are you looking for genius ways to encourage students not to blurt out answers during class? If so, keep reading.

1. Provide sufficient chances to respond (i.e., enthusiastic students need many chances to contribute).

2. Give academic and leisure learning activities that let the student be highly active and talkative.

3. Talk regularly with the student to lessen the need to blurt out answers without being called on.

4. Attempt several groupings to ascertain the situation in which the student is most comfortable.

5. Select a peer, paraprofessional, friend, etc., to signal the student when they blurt out responses (e.g., the person can touch the student on their arm or desk as a signal that they are blurting out responses).

6. Teach the student to recognize an appropriate time to speak (e.g., when the teacher has finished speaking, after raising their hand, to make remarks within the context of the situation, to make remarks that are a follow-up to what has just been said, etc.).

7. Make the appropriate adjustments in their surroundings to prevent the student from experiencing stress, frustration, or anger (e.g., lessen peer pressure, academic failure, teasing, etc.).

8. Urge the student to remind himself/herself to wait when they feel the urge to blurt out responses/answers (e.g., “Stop. Count to 10.”).

9. Provide visibility to and from the student to keep their attention when oral questions/instructions are being delivered. The teacher and the student should be able to see each other at all times. Make eye contact possible at all times.

10. Create rules for conversing with others (e.g., wait your turn to talk, stand quietly by the person with whom you want to talk until you are noticed, excuse yourself when you interrupt others, etc.). These rules should be consistent and followed by everyone in the class. Talk about the rules often.

11. Praise those students in the classroom who wait to be called on before speaking.

12. Talk with the student to explain(a) what the student is doing wrong (e.g., blurting out answers) and (b) what the student should be doing (e.g., waiting until it is appropriate to speak, waiting to be called on before speaking, etc.).

13. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., waiting to be called on before speaking) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

14. Urge the student to model the behavior of peers who successfully wait to answer questions.

15. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

16. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

17. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

18. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

24 Ways to Teach Learners Not to Blurt Out Answers During Class

Are you looking for ways to teach students not to blurt out answers during class? If so, keep reading.

1. Make sure that reinforcement is not provided for unacceptable behavior(e.g., paying attention to the student only when they blurt out answers without being called on).

2. Praise the student for raising their hand to be recognized.

3. Show the student why they have been asked not to talk.

4. Give the student a predetermined signal if they begin to blurt out answers without being called on.

5. Give constant, positive reinforcement for appropriate behavior. Ignore as many unacceptable behaviors as possible.

6. Urge the student to self-monitor their impulsivity. Awareness should lessen impulsive behaviors.

7. Get the student to work in small groups in which there are frequent chances to speak. As the student learns to wait longer for a turn to speak, slowly increase the size of the group.

8. Assess the appropriateness of the social situation concerning the student’s capacity and ability to function successfully.

9. Organize the student’s surroundings to limit chances for unacceptable behaviors (e.g., keep the student engaged in learning activities, have the student seated near the teacher, allow several responses when appropriate, etc.).

10. Teach yourself and others about ADHD to increase comprehension and accommodation of impatient behavior.

11. Give the student an easily grasped list of consequences for unacceptable behavior.

12. Assist the student in improving concentration skills (e.g., listening to the speaker, taking notes, preparing remarks in advance, making remarks in an appropriate context, etc.).

13. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to become overexcited and blurt out answers without being called on.

14. Teach the student about ADHD and the need for developing skills to self-monitor behavior.

15. Urge the student to create an understanding of themselves and those around him/her. Get the student to periodically step back and ask themselves, “Am I blurting out answers and dominating the conversation?”

16. Urge the student to create an understanding of the consequences of their behavior by writing down or talking through problems that may happen due to their impulsivity (e.g., perceived as unmannerly, avoided, etc.).

17. Make the student aware of the number of times they blurt out answers without being called on.

18. Train the student to carry a notepad with him/ her at all times and to write information down to help them remember.

19. Make sure the student does not become overstimulated by a learning experience.

20. Get the student to practice waiting for short periods for a turn to speak. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for a turn to speak.

21. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

23. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

24. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

24 Strategies to Teach Learners Not to Blurt Out Answers During Class

Are you looking for strategies to teach students not to blurt out answers during class? If so, keep reading.

1. Create classroom rules: • Remain on-task. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. • Raise your hand. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

2. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s appropriate behavior. The parents may reinforce the student at home for waiting to be called on before speaking.

3. Ask questions frequently to prevent the student from becoming impatient and blurting out answers.

4. Do not criticize when correcting the student; be honest yet compassionate. Never cause the student to feel negatively about themselves.

5. Do not let the student interrupt you by letting them talk to you at the time they blurt out answers. Inform the student that they will need to wait until you are finished talking. Allowing the student to talk after interrupting reinforces the behavior and may increase the number of times they blurt out answers.

6. Give the student many chances for social and academic success.

7. Do not let the student use ADHD as an excuse. Hold the student responsible for their actions. However, accept the problems that ADHD brings into the student’s life while they are learning to make accommodations.

8. Ask the student a question when they are most likely to be able to respond correctly.

9. Try to give equal attention to all students in the classroom.

10. Provide directions, explanations, and instructions in a clear, concise manner to lessen the student’s need to ask questions.

11. Minimize learning activities that might threaten the student (e.g., lessen peer pressure, academic failure, teasing, etc.).

12. Provide the student with duties in the classroom (e.g., running errands, chances to help the teacher, etc.).

13. Get the student to be the leader of a cooperative learning experience if they possess a mastery of a skill or have an interest in that area.

14. Take the student away from the learning experience until they can demonstrate appropriate behavior and self-control.

15. Always treat the student with the utmost respect. Talk objectively at all times.

16. Teach the student to use techniques such as crossing their arms and legs, clinching their fists, and webbing their hands when they feel the urge to blurt out answers without being called on.

17. Show the student the reasons why blurting out answers without being called on is unacceptable (e.g., impolite, hurts others’ feelings, etc.).

18. Praise the student for waiting to be called on before speaking: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, five minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

19. Praise the student for waiting to be called on before speaking based on the number of times the student can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the number of times required for reinforcement.

20. Make sure that the student’s feelings are considered when it is appropriate to deal with unacceptable remarks (i.e., handle remarks in such a way as to not diminish the student’s enthusiasm for participation).

21. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

23. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

24. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

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