Teaching Students About the Connecticut Plan

The Connecticut Plan is a critical aspect of American history, and it is essential for students to understand its significance. This plan is significant because it paved the way for many social and economic reforms that transformed American society. As an educator, it is essential to teach students about the Connecticut Plan to enable them to appreciate the efforts that led to its creation. Here are some ways to teach students about the Connecticut Plan.

1. Define the Connecticut Plan

The Connecticut Plan, also known as the “Great Compromise,” was a proposal that sought to solve the issue of representation in the United States Congress. The plan sought to balance the interests of both large and small states and address the issue of representation in the legislative assembly.

2. Discuss the Background of the Connecticut Plan

The Connecticut Plan was developed at the Constitutional Convention of 1787, during which delegates from various states gathered to create a new constitution. The plan aimed to address the representation issue that had caused a rift among the delegates. The large states wanted representation based on population, while the small states wanted an equal say in the legislative assembly.

3. Explain How the Connecticut Plan Was Developed

The Connecticut Plan was put forward by Roger Sherman, a delegate from Connecticut. This plan proposed that the legislative assembly would have two chambers: the Senate and the House of Representatives. In the Senate, each state would have equal representation, while in the House, representation would be based on population.

4. Highlight the Significance of the Connecticut Plan

The Connecticut Plan was significant because it led to the creation of the United States Constitution. It provided a balance between the interests of small and large states and paved the way for many social and economic reforms that transformed American society. For instance, it enabled the growth of industry, promoted domestic trade, and expanded the concept of individual rights.

5. Incorporate Activities and Discussions

To help students better understand the Connecticut Plan, educators can develop activities that allow students to engage with the topic critically. For instance, educators can develop debate activities that require students to take a stand on the issue of representation. Educators can also use primary source materials such as the documents from the Constitutional Convention to engage students in discussions about the Connecticut Plan.

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