Academic and Behavioral Interventions

18 Hacks to Motivate Learners to Exhibit Good Behavior During Group Games

Are you looking for hacks to motivate students to exhibit good behavior during group games? If so, keep reading.

1. Play the game with the student before they engage in the game with peers to model appropriate behavior, determine the student’s capacity and ability to play the game, determine the student’s capacity and ability to follow behavior rules, etc.

2. Get the student to take part in group games of short duration. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of group games.

3. Teach the student the appropriate skills needed to participate in group games successfully (e.g., volleyball, basketball, football, baseball, etc.).

4. Let the student select the group games that they will play with peers.

5. Take into account the student’s age and experience before expecting them to get along with others when playing group games.

6. Urge the student to use problem-solving skills: (a) find the problem, (b) find goals and objectives, (c) create strategies, (d) create a plan for action, and (e) carry out the plan.

7. Make sure the student connects the relationship between their behavior and the consequences that may follow (e.g., failing to get along when playing a group game will result in others not wanting to play with him/her).

8. Teach the student acceptable ways to express displeasure, anger, frustration, etc.

9. Select a peer who will be an excellent influence (e.g., someone younger, older, of the same gender, of the opposite gender, etc.) to play with the student.

10. Teach the student to think before acting.

11. Let the student voice their opinion in a situation to avoid becoming angry or upset.

12. Converse with the student about ways of handling situations successfully without conflict (e.g., walk away from a situation, change to another learning experience, ask for help, etc.).

13. Do not force the student to play games with someone with whom they are not entirely comfortable with.

14. Intervene early and often when there is a problem to prevent more severe problems from happening.

15. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

16. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

17. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

18. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

24 Ways to Encourage Learners to Exhibit Good Behavior During Group Games

Are you looking for ways to encourage students to exhibit good behavior during group games? If so, keep reading.

1. Make sure that the student knows that interacting with peers in group games is contingent upon appropriate behavior.

2. Get the student to practice appropriate interactions with the teacher(s) in group games.

3. Teach the student appropriate ways to interact with peers in group games (e.g., suggest learning activities, share learning materials, problem-solve, take turns, follow game rules, etc.).

4. Observe group games closely, so peers with whom the student interacts do not encourage unacceptable behavior.

5. Make sure that group games are not so stimulating as to make successful interactions with peers complicated.

6. Designate older peers with desirable social skills to interact with the student in group games.

7. Include the student in extracurricular learning activities to urge interaction with peers in group games.

8. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Failure may encourage unacceptable behavior in group games.

9. Teach the student problem-solving skills so they may better deal with problems that may happen in interactions with peers in group games (e.g., talking, walking away, calling upon an arbitrator, compromising, etc.).

10. Find the peer with whom the student is most likely to be able to interact in group games successfully (e.g., a student with similar interests, background, classes, behavior patterns, nonacademic schedule, etc.).

11. Organize the group games according to the needs/abilities of the student (e.g., create rules, limit the stimulation of the learning activities, limit the length of the game, consider the time of day, etc.).

12. Restrict chances for interaction in group games on those occasions when the student is not likely to be successful (e.g., if the student has experienced academic or social failure prior to the scheduled group game).

13. Choose group games designed to enable an appropriate interaction between the student and peers.

14. Via observation and interviews with other students, determine the student’s characteristics that interfere with successful interactions during group games to ascertain skills or behaviors that the student needs to create for successful interactions.

15. Make sure beforehand that the student can successfully take part in the group game (e.g., the student knows the rules, the student is familiar with the game, the student will be compatible with the other students playing the game, etc.).

16. Make sure the student knows that failing to interact properly with peers during group games may result in termination of the game and/or loss of future chances to part in group games.

17. Get the student to interact with peers for short periods to enable success. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time the student interacts.

18. Get the student to study, practice, simulate, etc., the rules for group games before participating.

19. Create a set of standard behavior rules for group games (e.g., follow rules of the game, take turns, make positive remarks, work as a team member, be an excellent sport, etc.).

20. Take the student away from group games if they are unable to demonstrate appropriate behavior.

24 Strategies to Teach Learners to Exhibit Good Behavior During Group Games

Are you looking for strategies to teach students to exhibit good behavior during group games? If so, keep reading.

1. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior in group games: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

2. Converse with the student to explain (a) what they are doing wrong (e.g., failing to follow the rules, cheating, etc.) and (b) what they must be doing (e.g., following the rules, playing fairly, etc.).

3. Create classroom rules: • Complete every assignment. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. • Raise your hand. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

4. Praise those students in the classroom who demonstrate appropriate behavior in group games.

5. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior in group games based on the duration of time the student can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for reinforcement.

6. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., following the rules) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

7. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for demonstrating appropriate behavior in group games at school.

8. Assess the appropriateness of the group game to ascertain if the game is too complicated and if the duration of time scheduled to finish the game is sufficient.

9. Select a peer to model appropriate behavior in group games for the student.

10. Get the student to question any directions, explanations, or instructions they do not understand.

11. Assess the expectations for participation in group games to ascertain if the student can be successful in the interaction and for the expected length of time.

12. Let the student select a group of peers with whom they feel comfortable to play group games.

13. Get the student to take part in a game learning experience with one peer. As the student shows success, slowly increase the size of the group.

14. Ascertain the peers with whom the student would most prefer to interact in group games and attempt to enable the interaction.

15. Select outgoing, nonmenacing peers to interact with the student in group games.

16. Organize their surroundings so the student has many chances to interact with peers in group games.

17. Designate the student to interact with younger peers in group games.

18. Select group games in which the student is likely to interact successfully with peers.

19. Organize a sociometric learning experience with the class to ascertain those peers who would most prefer to interact with the student in group games.

20. Make sure that the student shows appropriate behavior in nonacademic situations prior to placing them with peers for group games.

21. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

23. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

24. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

28 Interventions to Teach Learners to Work Effectively in a Group Setting

Are you looking for interventions to teach students to work effectively in a group setting? If so, keep reading.

1. Provide sufficient chances to respond (i.e., enthusiastic students need many chances to contribute).

2. Give the student a predetermined signal if they begin to talk beyond what is required or at unacceptable times.

3. Show the student that they may be trying too hard to fit in and that they should relax, talk less, and talk at appropriate times.

4. Give the student many chances for social and academic success.

5. Make the appropriate adjustments in their surroundings (e.g., lessen peer pressure, academic failure, teasing, etc.) to prevent the student from experiencing stress, frustration, or anger.

6. Provide visibility to and from the student. The teacher and the student should be able to see each other. Make eye contact possible at all times.

7. Talk regularly with the student to lessen their need to talk beyond what is required or at unacceptable times.

8. Assess the appropriateness of the social situation concerning the student’s capacity and ability to function successfully.

9. Praise the student for raising their hand to be recognized.

10. Teach the student to recognize when to speak, to know how much to say, and to make appropriate remarks (e.g., brief remarks, remarks within the context of the situation, remarks that are a follow-up to what has just been said, etc.).

11. Get the student to work in small groups in which they would have frequent chances to speak. As the student learns to wait longer for their turn to speak, slowly increase the size of the group.

12. Make sure that the student’s feelings are considered when it is appropriate to deal with his/her unacceptable remarks (i.e., use remarks that do not diminish the student’s enthusiasm for participation).

13. Urge the student to model the behavior of successful peers.

14. Facilitate learning activities (e.g., school bulletin board, class project, bake sale, etc.) in which students work together for a common goal rather than individual success or recognition. Emphasize that bigger accomplishments are realized through group effort rather than by individual effort.

15. Provide directions, explanations, and instructions concisely to lessen the student’s need to ask questions.

16. Get the student to practice waiting for short periods for their turn to speak. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for reinforcement.

17. Show the student the reasons why talking beyond what is required and at unacceptable times is unacceptable (e.g., is impolite, interrupts others, etc.).

18. Try to give equal attention to all students in the classroom.

19. Make the student aware of the number of times they talk beyond what is required and at unacceptable times.

20. Compose group constructs that urge students to work together for group success.

21. Show the student why they have been asked not to talk.

22. Get the student to take part in small group learning activities (e.g., free time, math, reading, etc.) to lessen the level of auditory and visual stimuli in the group. As the student can function successfully, slowly increase the size of the group.

23. Assist the student in improving concentration skills (e.g., listening to the speaker, taking notes, preparing remarks in advance, making remarks in an appropriate context, etc.

24. Get the student to question any directions, explanations, or instructions they do not understand.

25. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

26. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

27. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

28. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

24 Techniques to Motivate Learners to Work Effectively in a Group Setting

Are you looking for techniques to motivate students to work effectively in a group setting? If so, keep reading.

1. Give the student alternative ways to perform a group task and let the student select the most desirable (e.g., a written paragraph task may be accomplished by writing a note to a friend, writing about a recent experience, describing a favorite pastime, etc.).

2. Let the student take part in one cooperative learning experience they prefer. Make the student take part in more group learning activities as they experience success.

3. Plan group learning activities when the student is most likely to be successful (e.g., before recess rather than immediately after recess, after the first individual task of the day has been finished to create productive behavior, etc.).

4. Plan alternative individual learning activities if the student is unlikely to be successful (e.g., if the schedule has been changed, if holidays or special activities have stimulated the student and make successful group interaction unlikely, etc.).

5. Assess the appropriateness of the designated task to ascertain (a) if the task is too easy, (b) if the task is too complicated, and (c) if the duration of time scheduled is sufficient.

6. Place the student’s desk or work area, so they work near other students but are not visually distracted by them (e.g., turn the student’s desk away from other students, etc.).

7. Let the student leave a cooperative learning experience and return to independent work when they can no longer be successful in the cooperative learning experience (e.g., as an alternative to disrupting the group, fighting, etc.).

8. Take into account the student’s age and experience before expecting them to get along in a group.

9. Intervene early and often when there is a problem to prevent more severe problems from happening.

10. Do not force the student to interact with people with whom they are not entirely comfortable.

11. Teach the student acceptable ways to express displeasure, anger, frustration, etc.

12. Teach the student to think before acting (e.g., they should ask themselves, “What is happening?” “What am I doing?” “What should I do?” “What will be best for me?”).

13. Urge the student to use problem-solving skills: (a) find the problem, (b) find goals and objectives, (c) create strategies, (d) create a plan for action, (e) carry out the plan.

14. Let the student voice their opinion in a situation to avoid becoming angry or upset.

15. Converse with the student about ways of handling situations successfully without conflict (e.g., walk away from the situation, change to another learning experience, ask for help, etc.).

16. Praise the student for talking an appropriate duration of time and at appropriate times in the classroom: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

17. Talk with the student to explain(a) what they are doing wrong (e.g., talking more than is appropriate or at unacceptable times) and (b) what they must be doing (e.g., keeping remarks brief, waiting until it is appropriate to speak, thinking of remarks that relate to the situation, etc.).

18. Praise those students in the classroom who make their remarks brief or speak at appropriate times.

19. Praise the student for making appropriate remarks or speaking at an appropriate time based on the duration of time they can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for reinforcement.

20. Make sure that reinforcement is not provided for unacceptable behavior(e.g., talking beyond what is required or at unacceptable times).

21. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

23. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

24. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

24 Ways to Encourage Learners to Work Effectively in a Group Setting

Are you looking for ways to encourage students to work effectively in a group setting? If so, keep reading.

1. Give the student the chance to select a cooperative learning experience and the group members (e.g., along with the teacher, decide what the learning experience will be and decide what individual group members will do, etc.).

2. Designate the student a role to perform in the cooperative learning experience that they can perform successfully (e.g., secretary, researcher, group behavior monitor, etc.).

3. Make sure the student is productive and accurate in performing individual tasks before placing them in a cooperative learning experience.

4. Provide the student with duties in group situations so others might view the student positively.

5. Make sure that the student can follow classroom rules and expectations independently before placing them in a cooperative learning experience.

6. Assist the student in learning to be happy with their best effort rather than some arbitrary measure of success. Success is measured individually according to capacity and ability level, and progress of any kind is a measure of success.

7. Place the student with peers who will be appropriate role models and are likely to enable the student’s academic and behavioral successes.

8. Place the student with group members who are least likely to be menacing (e.g., younger students, students just learning a skill the student has already learned, etc.).

9. Make sure the student knows the instructions for the cooperative learning experience (e.g., give instructions in an assortment of ways, make sure that the student knows their role, go over the rules for group behavior before the learning experience begins, etc.).

10. Make sure the student has all the needed learning materials to perform their role in the group (e.g., paper, pencil, art supplies, reference learning materials, etc.).

11. Make sure the student has enough room to work successfully (e.g., distance from other students, room for all learning materials, etc.).

12. Make sure the academic and social requirements of the group situation are within the student’s capacity and ability level.

13. Take the student away from the group if their behavior is unacceptable.

14. Make sure the student is actively involved in the group situation (e.g., call on the student regularly, designate the student a responsibility such as a teacher’s assistant, have them be the group leader, etc.).

15. Let the student join the group after the learning experience has begun if they are unable to participate properly at the beginning of the cooperative learning experience.

16. Assist the student in getting to know group members before requiring group participation (e.g., introduce the students to one another, let the students have unstructured free time together, etc.).

17. Minimize distracting stimuli that could interfere with the student’s success in a cooperative learning experience (e.g., give enough room to move without physical contact, keep noise level at a minimum, keep movement in their surroundings to a minimum, etc.).

18. Plan group learning activities so the teacher can spend uninterrupted time with the group.

19. Plan group learning activities as part of the student’s daily routine (schedule) (i.e., group learning activities should happen on a regularly scheduled basis so the student will be prepared and know what to expect).

20. Put the student in group learning activities they prefer. As the student shows success, slowly require the student to take part in less desirable learning activities.

21. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

23. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

24. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

24 Strategies to Teach Learners to Work Effectively in a Group Setting

Are you looking for strategies to help students to work effectively in a group setting? If so, keep reading.

1. Praise the student for working in a group situation: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

2. Talk with the student to explain(a) what the student is doing wrong (e.g., failing to part) and (b) what the student should be doing (e.g., talking, taking turns, playing, sharing, etc.).

3. Create classroom rules: • Complete every assignment. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. • Raise your hand. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

4. Praise other students in the classroom for working properly in a group situation.

5. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., working properly with peers) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

6. Connect with parents to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for participating properly in group situations at school.

7. Do not force the student to take part in group situations until they can be successful.

8. Select a peer to sit/work directly with the student (e.g., in various settings such as art, music, P.E., on the bus, or various learning activities such as tutoring, group projects, running errands in the school building, recess, etc.).

9. Reward or urge other students for their participation in group situations.

10. Give the student the responsibility of helping a peer in group situations.

11. Review group rules and expectations at the beginning of each cooperative learning experience.

12. Ask the student a question when they are most likely to be able to respond successfully (e.g., when discussing a topic in which the student is interested, when the teacher is sure the student knows the answer, etc.).

13. Attempt several groupings to ascertain the situation in which the student is most comfortable.

14. Get peers to invite the student to take part in school or extracurricular learning activities.

15. Get the student to lead a cooperative learning experience when they possess mastery or an interest in the learning experience.

16. Let the student be present during group learning activities without requiring active participation. Require more involvement over time as the student becomes more active in group situations.

17. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Fear of failure may cause the student to be reluctant to take part in group situations.

18. Get the student to work with one or two other group members. As the student becomes more comfortable, slowly increase the size of the group.

19. Show respect for the student’s opinions, responses, suggestions, etc.

20. Give the student the chance to pick a topic or learning experience for the group to work on together.

21. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

23. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

24. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

19 Tactics to Motivate Learners to Exhibit Acceptable Behavior in Large Group Settings

Are you looking for strategies to help students to exhibit acceptable behavior in large groups? If so, keep reading.

1. Write group agreements that urge students to work together for group success.

2. Find related group learning activities the student can perform successfully (e.g., acting as a teacher’s assistant, giving instructions, handing out learning materials, collecting learning materials, etc.).

3. Plan daily learning activities so that highly desirable learning activities follow large academic group learning activities and are contingent upon appropriate behavior in the large academic cooperative learning experience.

4. Get the student to question any directions, explanations, or instructions they do not understand.

5. Teach the student to think before acting (e.g., they should ask themselves, “What is happening?” “What am I doing?” “What should I do?” “What will be best for me?”).

6. Make sure that your remarks are in the form of constructive criticism rather than criticism that can be perceived as personal, etc.

7. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too easy, (b) if the task is too complicated, and (c) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

8. Connect with parents to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for working properly in a large academic group setting at school.

9. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., working properly with peers) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

10. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior in a large academic group setting based on the duration of time they can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for reinforcement.

11. Praise those students in the classroom who demonstrate appropriate behavior in a large academic group setting.

12. Create classroom rules: • Complete every assignment. • Complete assignments quietly. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

13. Converse with the student to explain (a) what they are doing wrong (e.g., talking out of turn, failing to part, etc.) and (b) what they must be doing (e.g., talking when appropriate, taking turns, sharing, etc.).

14. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior in a large academic group setting: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

15. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

16. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

17. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

18. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

24 Ways to Encourage Learners to Exhibit Acceptable Behavior in Large Group Settings

Are you looking for ways to encourage students to exhibit acceptable behavior in large groups? If so, keep reading.

1. Give the student alternative ways to perform a group task and let them select the most desirable (e.g., a written paragraph task may be accomplished by writing a note to a friend, writing about a recent experience, describing a favorite pastime, etc.).

2. Let the student take part in the large cooperative learning experience they prefer. As the student experiences success, require them to take part in larger group learning activities.

3. Get the student to participate in at least one large cooperative learning experience per day. As the student shows success, slowly require the student to take part in larger group learning activities.

4. Plan large group learning activities when the student is most likely to be successful (e.g., before recess rather than immediately after recess, after the first individual task of the day has been finished to create productive behavior, etc.).

5. Plan alternative individual learning activities if the student is unlikely to be successful (e.g., if the schedule has been changed; if holidays or special activities have stimulated the student, making successful group interactions unlikely; etc.).

6. Let the student join the group after the learning experience has begun if they are unable to 6 properly at the beginning of the learning experience.

7. Place the student’s desk or work so that they work near other students but are not visually distracted by them (e.g., turn the student’s desk away from other students).

8. Let the student leave a cooperative learning experience and return to independent work when they can no longer be successful in the cooperative learning experience (e.g., as an alternative to disrupting the group, fighting, etc.).

9. Coordinate the student’s seating so that you can interact with them regularly (e.g., near the front of the room, on the perimeter of the group, etc.).

10. Select a peer to sit/work next to the student to assist.

11. Get the student to keep a list of classroom rules at their desk (e.g., attached to the surface of the desk, inside the desk, etc.).

12. Utilize a “time-out” area to let the student gain self-control if problem behaviors happen during a large academic cooperative learning experience.

13. Give a carrel or other quiet study area for the student to use if they cannot be successful at their seat.

14. Utilize removal from the group as a natural consequence for unacceptable behavior.

15. Show academic tasks in the most attractive and exciting manner possible.

16. Integrate the student into a large academic cooperative learning experience only after they have had success with one other student, a small group, etc.

17. Integrate the student into a large academic cooperative learning experience slowly (e.g., short periods with the group lead to longer periods).

18. Give the student the chance to work with a peer tutor, volunteer, etc., for enrichment or support of content presented in the large academic cooperative learning experience.

19. Give structure so that the large academic cooperative learning experience does not become overstimulating for the student.

20. Publicly praise the student for appropriate behavior and privately redirect unacceptable behavior.

21. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

23. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

24. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

19 Strategies to Teach Learners to Exhibit Acceptable Behavior in Large Group Settings

Are you looking for strategies to teach students to exhibit acceptable behavior in large groups? If so, keep reading.

1. Make sure that the student has all needed learning materials to perform their role in the group (e.g., paper, pencil, art supplies, reference learning materials). As the student becomes more comfortable, slowly increase the group size.

2. Make sure that the student knows the instructions for the cooperative learning experience (e.g., give instructions in an assortment of ways, make sure that the student knows their role, review the rules for group behavior before the learning experience begins, etc.).

3. Make sure the student has enough room to work successfully (e.g., distance from other students, room for all learning materials, etc.).

4. Make sure the student is actively involved in the group (e.g., call on the student regularly, designate the student a responsibility such as a teacher’s assistant, have the student be group leader, etc.).

5. Take the student away from the group if they behave improperly.

6. Make sure the academic and social requirements of the group situation are within the student’s capacity and ability level.

7. Assist the student in getting to know group members before requiring group participation (e.g., introduce the students to one another; let the students have unstructured free time together; etc.).

8. Minimize distracting stimuli that could interfere with the student’s success in a cooperative learning experience (e.g., give enough room to move without physical contact; keep noise level to a minimum; keep movement in their surroundings to a minimum; etc.).

9. Plan learning activities so you can be spend uninterrupted time with the group.

10. Plan large group learning activities as part of the student’s daily routine (schedule) (e.g., large group learning activities should happen on a regularly scheduled basis so that the student will be prepared and know what to expect).

16. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

17. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

18. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

19. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.