Pedagogue Blog

23 Strategies to Teach Learners Not to Interrupt Others

Are you looking for strategies to teach students not to interrupt others? If so, keep reading.

1. Connect with the student’s parents to disseminate information about the student’s appropriate behavior. The parents may reinforce the student at home for not interrupting other students at school.

2. Urge the student to say a mantra to themselves when entering a situation where they may be inclined to interrupt (e.g., do not interrupt, do not interrupt, do not interrupt).

3. Train the student to carry a notepad with him/her at all times and to write information down to help them remember.

4. Teach yourself and others about ADHD to increase comprehension and accommodation of interruptive behavior.

5. Assist the student in realizing that all behavior has negative or positive consequences. Urge the student to practice behaviors that will lead to positive consequences.

6. Urge the student to create an understanding of themselves and those around him/her. Get the student to periodically step back and ask themselves, “Am I interrupting others?”

7. Urge the student to create an understanding of the consequences of their behavior by writing down or talking through problems that may happen due to interrupting others (e.g., perceived as unmannerly, avoided, etc.).

8. Take into account the student’s age and capacity and ability level carefully before expecting them not to interrupt others when they are talking, working, reading, etc.

9. Teach the student about ADHD and the need to self-monitor behavior.

10. Give constant, positive reinforcement for appropriate behavior. Ignore as many unacceptable behaviors as possible.

11. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., classroom privileges, passing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

12. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior (e.g., waiting for a turn to speak, working quietly, etc.) based on the duration of time the student can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for reinforcement.

13. Select a peer to model appropriate behavior for the student.

14. Urge the student to become aware of the times when they are most impulsive and likely to interrupt others (e.g., in a large group of people, when they are angry, etc.) and limit their interactions with others during these times.

15. Converse with the student before starting a learning experience and remind them of the importance of listening to others.

16. Praise those students in the classroom who wait for their turn to speak, do not interrupt others, work quietly, etc.

17. Give the student an easily grasped list of consequences for unacceptable behavior.

18. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to become anxious and interrupt others.

19. Teach the student to read signals from others (e.g., if they begin to interrupt a peer and that person continues to talk, realize that they are interrupting and stop talking; when there is silence in a class, it is not appropriate to fill the silence with remarks, etc.).

20. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

21. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

23. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

18 Genius Ways to Encourage Learners Not to Blurt Out Answers During Class

Are you looking for genius ways to encourage students not to blurt out answers during class? If so, keep reading.

1. Provide sufficient chances to respond (i.e., enthusiastic students need many chances to contribute).

2. Give academic and leisure learning activities that let the student be highly active and talkative.

3. Talk regularly with the student to lessen the need to blurt out answers without being called on.

4. Attempt several groupings to ascertain the situation in which the student is most comfortable.

5. Select a peer, paraprofessional, friend, etc., to signal the student when they blurt out responses (e.g., the person can touch the student on their arm or desk as a signal that they are blurting out responses).

6. Teach the student to recognize an appropriate time to speak (e.g., when the teacher has finished speaking, after raising their hand, to make remarks within the context of the situation, to make remarks that are a follow-up to what has just been said, etc.).

7. Make the appropriate adjustments in their surroundings to prevent the student from experiencing stress, frustration, or anger (e.g., lessen peer pressure, academic failure, teasing, etc.).

8. Urge the student to remind himself/herself to wait when they feel the urge to blurt out responses/answers (e.g., “Stop. Count to 10.”).

9. Provide visibility to and from the student to keep their attention when oral questions/instructions are being delivered. The teacher and the student should be able to see each other at all times. Make eye contact possible at all times.

10. Create rules for conversing with others (e.g., wait your turn to talk, stand quietly by the person with whom you want to talk until you are noticed, excuse yourself when you interrupt others, etc.). These rules should be consistent and followed by everyone in the class. Talk about the rules often.

11. Praise those students in the classroom who wait to be called on before speaking.

12. Talk with the student to explain(a) what the student is doing wrong (e.g., blurting out answers) and (b) what the student should be doing (e.g., waiting until it is appropriate to speak, waiting to be called on before speaking, etc.).

13. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., waiting to be called on before speaking) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

14. Urge the student to model the behavior of peers who successfully wait to answer questions.

15. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

16. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

17. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

18. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

24 Ways to Teach Learners Not to Blurt Out Answers During Class

Are you looking for ways to teach students not to blurt out answers during class? If so, keep reading.

1. Make sure that reinforcement is not provided for unacceptable behavior(e.g., paying attention to the student only when they blurt out answers without being called on).

2. Praise the student for raising their hand to be recognized.

3. Show the student why they have been asked not to talk.

4. Give the student a predetermined signal if they begin to blurt out answers without being called on.

5. Give constant, positive reinforcement for appropriate behavior. Ignore as many unacceptable behaviors as possible.

6. Urge the student to self-monitor their impulsivity. Awareness should lessen impulsive behaviors.

7. Get the student to work in small groups in which there are frequent chances to speak. As the student learns to wait longer for a turn to speak, slowly increase the size of the group.

8. Assess the appropriateness of the social situation concerning the student’s capacity and ability to function successfully.

9. Organize the student’s surroundings to limit chances for unacceptable behaviors (e.g., keep the student engaged in learning activities, have the student seated near the teacher, allow several responses when appropriate, etc.).

10. Teach yourself and others about ADHD to increase comprehension and accommodation of impatient behavior.

11. Give the student an easily grasped list of consequences for unacceptable behavior.

12. Assist the student in improving concentration skills (e.g., listening to the speaker, taking notes, preparing remarks in advance, making remarks in an appropriate context, etc.).

13. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to become overexcited and blurt out answers without being called on.

14. Teach the student about ADHD and the need for developing skills to self-monitor behavior.

15. Urge the student to create an understanding of themselves and those around him/her. Get the student to periodically step back and ask themselves, “Am I blurting out answers and dominating the conversation?”

16. Urge the student to create an understanding of the consequences of their behavior by writing down or talking through problems that may happen due to their impulsivity (e.g., perceived as unmannerly, avoided, etc.).

17. Make the student aware of the number of times they blurt out answers without being called on.

18. Train the student to carry a notepad with him/ her at all times and to write information down to help them remember.

19. Make sure the student does not become overstimulated by a learning experience.

20. Get the student to practice waiting for short periods for a turn to speak. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for a turn to speak.

21. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

23. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

24. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

24 Strategies to Teach Learners Not to Blurt Out Answers During Class

Are you looking for strategies to teach students not to blurt out answers during class? If so, keep reading.

1. Create classroom rules: • Remain on-task. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. • Raise your hand. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

2. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s appropriate behavior. The parents may reinforce the student at home for waiting to be called on before speaking.

3. Ask questions frequently to prevent the student from becoming impatient and blurting out answers.

4. Do not criticize when correcting the student; be honest yet compassionate. Never cause the student to feel negatively about themselves.

5. Do not let the student interrupt you by letting them talk to you at the time they blurt out answers. Inform the student that they will need to wait until you are finished talking. Allowing the student to talk after interrupting reinforces the behavior and may increase the number of times they blurt out answers.

6. Give the student many chances for social and academic success.

7. Do not let the student use ADHD as an excuse. Hold the student responsible for their actions. However, accept the problems that ADHD brings into the student’s life while they are learning to make accommodations.

8. Ask the student a question when they are most likely to be able to respond correctly.

9. Try to give equal attention to all students in the classroom.

10. Provide directions, explanations, and instructions in a clear, concise manner to lessen the student’s need to ask questions.

11. Minimize learning activities that might threaten the student (e.g., lessen peer pressure, academic failure, teasing, etc.).

12. Provide the student with duties in the classroom (e.g., running errands, chances to help the teacher, etc.).

13. Get the student to be the leader of a cooperative learning experience if they possess a mastery of a skill or have an interest in that area.

14. Take the student away from the learning experience until they can demonstrate appropriate behavior and self-control.

15. Always treat the student with the utmost respect. Talk objectively at all times.

16. Teach the student to use techniques such as crossing their arms and legs, clinching their fists, and webbing their hands when they feel the urge to blurt out answers without being called on.

17. Show the student the reasons why blurting out answers without being called on is unacceptable (e.g., impolite, hurts others’ feelings, etc.).

18. Praise the student for waiting to be called on before speaking: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, five minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

19. Praise the student for waiting to be called on before speaking based on the number of times the student can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the number of times required for reinforcement.

20. Make sure that the student’s feelings are considered when it is appropriate to deal with unacceptable remarks (i.e., handle remarks in such a way as to not diminish the student’s enthusiasm for participation).

21. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

23. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

24. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

24 Ways to Teach Kids Not to Abuse Drugs or Alcohol

Are you looking for ways to teach kids not to abuse drugs or alcohol? If so, keep reading.

1. Minimize the emphasis on competition and help the student realize that success is individually defined.

2. Be willing to take the time to listen, share, and talk with the student.

3. Boost your own professional knowledge of laws and treatment about drug or alcohol use and abuse.

4. Teach the student alternative ways to deal with requirements, challenges, and pressures of the school experience (e.g., deal with problems when they arise, practice self-control at all times, share problems or concerns with others, etc.).

5. Provide sufficient supervision at all times and in all areas of the school (e.g., hallways, bathrooms, between classes, before and after school, school grounds, etc.).

6. Make sure the student is aware of local, state, and federal laws regarding the possession of unacceptable or illegal learning materials on school grounds.

7. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for demonstrating appropriate behavior at school.

8. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., not bringing alcohol to school) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

9. Take the student away from the learning experience until they can demonstrate appropriate behavior and self-control.

10. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior based on the duration of time they can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for reinforcement.

11. Praise those students in the classroom who demonstrate appropriate behavior.

12. Create classroom rules: • Complete every assignment. • Complete assignments quietly. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

13. Talk with the student to explain(a) what the student is doing wrong (e.g., bringing unacceptable or illegal learning materials to school) and (b) what the student should be doing (e.g., following an established code of conduct, following rules, taking care of duties, etc.).

14. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

15. Give the student personal acknowledgment during school hours (e.g., follow up on details of earlier communications, keep a direction for conversation, etc.).

16. Intervene early and often when there is a problem to prevent more severe problems from happening.

17. Teach the student to think before acting (e.g., they should ask themselves, “What is happening?” “What am I doing?” “What should I do?” “What will be best for me?”).

18. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

19. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

20. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

21. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

22. Consider using a socio-emotional learning app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

23. Consider using an emotional intelligence app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

24. Consider using a school counseling app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

25 Strategies to Help Learners Who Abuse Drugs or Alcohol

Are you looking for strategies to help students who abuse drugs or alcohol? If so, keep reading.

1. Connect with parents, agencies, or appropriate parties to tell them about the problem, identify the cause of the problem, and discuss potential solutions to the problem.

2. Give a drug information program for the individual student, the class, or the student body.

3. Give information on penalties for possession or use of alcohol and drugs at school.

4. Include the student in extracurricular learning activities to help them create appropriate interests.

5. Identify individuals the student may contact about their concerns (e.g., guidance counselor, school nurse, social worker, school psychologist, etc.).

6. Convey concerns to the administration and seek a referral to an agency for investigation of alcohol or drug abuse.

7. Urge the student to become involved in athletic or extracurricular learning activities.

8. Designate the student learning activities that would require interactions with a respected role model (e.g., older student, high school student, college student, community leader, someone held in esteem, etc.).

9. Give the student intelligent, accurate information about drugs and alcohol rather than using sensationalized scare tactics.

10. Give the student many chances for social and academic success.

11. Urge the student to excel in a particular area of interest (e.g., give information for the student; give personal and professional support; sponsor the student; etc.).

12. Provide frequent contact with the student during school hours (e.g., follow up on details of earlier communications, etc.).

13. Lead and direct the student. Do not lecture and make requirements.

14. Keep anecdotal records of the student’s behavior to track and monitor changes in behavior.

15. On occasions where logical consequences from peers happen (e.g., criticism, loss of friendship, etc.) because of the use of drugs or alcohol at school, bring the consequences to the student’s attention.

16. Urge the student’s parents to be positive and compassionate with the student as opposed to being negative and menacing.

17. Be a resource for parents by providing information on agencies, counseling programs, etc.

18. Teach the student to be happy with their personal best effort rather than perfection.

19. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

20. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

20. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

22. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

23. Consider using a socio-emotional learning app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

24. Consider using an emotional intelligence app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

25. Consider using a school counseling app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

16 Genius Ways to Teach Kids to Take Notes During Class

Are you looking for genius ways to teach students to take notes during class? If so, keep reading.

1. Show information in short segments for the student to take notes. As the student experiences success, slowly increase the length of the segments that are presented.

2. Make sure the vocabulary used in presenting instructions and lectures is appropriate for the student’s capacity and ability level.

3. Make sure the student has all the learning materials appropriate for note-taking (e.g., paper, pencil, pen, etc.).

4. Make sure the student uses any appropriate aids to enable note-taking (e.g., eyeglasses, hearing aid, etc.).

5. Put the student next to a peer so the student can copy the notes taken by the peer.

6. Make sure the student has sufficient surface space on which to write when taking notes (e.g., uncluttered desktop).

7. Minimize distracting stimuli that interfere with the student’s note-taking (e.g., other students talking, outdoor learning activities, movement in the classroom, hallway noise, etc.).

8. Show the information in the most exciting manner possible.

9. Get the student to record instructions and lectures as an alternative to written note-taking.

10. Summarize the main points of instructions and lectures for the student.

11. Show instructions following the (1) What, (2) How, (3) Learning materials, and (4) On occasions where outline.

12. Provide visibility to and from the student when delivering instructions and lectures to enable the student’s success in note-taking.

13. Get the student to take notes following the “What, How, Learning materials, and On occasions where” format when instructions are being given.

14. Get the student to listen and take notes for “Who, What, Where, On occasions where, How, and Why” when ideas are presented.

15. Show ideas following the (1) Who, (2) What, (3) Where, (4) On occasions where, (5) How, and (6) Why outline.

16. Consider providing the student with a notetaking app. Click here to view a list of the best of the best notetaking apps.

14 Ways to Teach Learners to Take Notes During Class

Are you looking for ways to teach students to take notes during class? If so, keep reading.

1. Teach the student that instructions or lectures should be written in the form of notes when they are presented.

2. Get the student to practice legible manuscript or cursive handwriting during simulated and actual note-taking learning activities.

3. Get the student to keep their notes organized in a folder for each subject or learning experience.

4. Inspect the student’s notes before they begin a task to ascertain if they contain sufficient information for the task.

5. Give the student an outline or questions to be finished during the presentation of instructions or lectures.

6. Give the student samples of students’ notes of classroom instructions or lectures that have been given so that they may learn what information is appropriate when taking notes.

7. Make sure the student is in the best place in the classroom to receive information for note-taking (e.g., near the board, teacher, or other sources of information).

8. Make sure that supervision of the student’s note-taking can easily be given.

9. Get the student to prepare for tests using the “Who, What, Where, On occasions where, How, and Why” method. The teacher should then test this same information.

10. Show instructions and lectures clearly and loudly enough for the student to hear.

11. Give the student both oral and written instructions.

12. Pair the rate of delivery of the instructions and lectures to the student’s capacity and ability to take notes.

13. Give instructions and lectures in sequential steps to enable student note-taking.

14. Consider providing the student with a notetaking app. Click here to view a list of the best of the best notetaking apps.

13 Strategies to Teach Learners to Take Notes During Class

Are you looking for strategies to teach students to take notes during class? If so, keep reading.

1. Praise the student for taking notes during class when appropriate: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

2. Converse with the student to explain (a) what they are doing wrong (e.g., failing to take notes) and (b) what they must be doing (e.g., taking notes).

3. Create classroom rules: • Complete every assignment. • Complete assignments quietly. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

4. Praise those students in the classroom who take notes during class when appropriate.

5. Praise the student for taking notes during class based on the duration of time they can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the required duration of time for taking notes for reinforcement.

6. Select a peer to model taking notes during class for the student.

7. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., taking notes) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

8. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for taking notes during class when appropriate.

9. Get the student to question any directions, explanations, or instructions they do not understand.

10. Teach the student note-taking skills (e.g., copy main ideas from the board, find main ideas from lectures, condense statements into a few keywords, etc.).

11. Give a standard format for writing down instructions or explanations (e.g., have paper and pencil or pen ready, listen for the steps in instructions or explanations, write a shortened form of instructions or explanations, ask to have any steps repeated when appropriate, etc.).

12. Give a standard format for taking lecture notes (e.g., have paper and pencil or pen ready, listen for main ideas or essential information, write a shortened form of main ideas or essential information, ask to have any main ideas or essential information repeated when appropriate, etc.).

13. Assess the appropriateness of note-taking to determine (a) if the task is too easy, (b) if the task is too complicated, and (c) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

14. Consider providing the student with a notetaking app. Click here to view a list of the best of the best notetaking apps.

23 Strategies to Help Learners Who Show Unacceptable Behavior Going to and from School

Are you looking for strategies to help students who show unacceptable behavior going to and from school? If so, keep reading.

1. Assess the appropriateness of the task concerning the student’s capacity and ability to perform the task successfully.

2. Select a peer to escort the student when going to and from school to monitor and urge appropriate behavior.

3. Escort the student when going to and from school to teach the student appropriate behavior (e.g., using sidewalks, crossing at crosswalks, taking the most direct route, boarding the bus, sitting quietly, remaining seated, leaving the bus, etc.).

4. Designate the student duties to perform when going to and from school (e.g., act as the bus driver’s assistant to monitor behavior, escort a younger peer to and from school, pick up trash on the way to and from school, etc.).

5. Urge the student to report problems that happen while going to and from school (e.g., being bullied, approached by strangers, teased by other students, etc.).

6. Let logical consequences happen if the student fails to demonstrate appropriate behavior when going to and from school (e.g., parents will have to give transportation and/or supervision).

7. Make sure the student is seated near the bus driver to prevent unacceptable behavior when riding the bus to and from school.

8. Create a behavioral agreement with the bus driver and the student for appropriate behavior on the bus while riding to and from school.

9. Get “block parents” to monitor the student’s behavior when going to and from school.

10. Prior to the student leaving the school, make sure that they know the rules about walking to and from school (e.g., walk on the sidewalk, walk nicely with friends, etc.).

11. Create rules for appropriate behavior when going to and from school: • Sit quietly on the bus. • Remain seated on the bus. • Utilize a quiet voice while on the bus. • Take the most direct route when walking to and from school. • Utilize sidewalks. • Follow up crossing rules at crosswalks. • Refrain from fighting on the way to and from school. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

12. Get the student to question any directions, explanations, or instructions they do not understand.

13. Select a peer to model appropriate behavior going to and from school for the student.

14. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for demonstrating appropriate behavior when going to and from school.

15. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., sitting quietly on the bus) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

16. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior going to and from school based on the number of times the student can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the number of times required for reinforcement.

17. Praise those students in the classroom who demonstrate appropriate behavior going to and from school.

18. Converse with the student to explain (a) what the student is doing wrong (e.g., fighting on the bus, taking an indirect route to and from school, etc.) and (b) what the student should be doing (e.g., sitting quietly on the bus, taking the most direct route to and from school, etc.).

19. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior going to and from school: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

20. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

21. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

23. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

16 Ways to Teach Learners to Raise Their Hand to Ask a Question

Are you looking for ways to teach students to raise their hand to ask a question? If so, keep reading.

1. Provide mobility to be regularly near the student when they display appropriate attention-seeking behaviors (e.g., hand-raising).

2. Make sure the student knows when it is acceptable to interrupt others (e.g., in an emergency).

3. Prior to beginning a learning experience, make sure the student knows the rules (e.g., wait quietly until the teacher can help, work quietly at your desk, etc.).

4. Get the student to raise their hand to question any directions, explanations, and instructions they do not understand.

5. Select a peer to model raising their hand when appropriate for the student.

6. Connect with parents to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for raising their hand when appropriate at school.

7. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., raising their hand for teacher assistance) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

8. Create classroom rules: • Complete every assignment. • Complete assignments quietly. • Request assistance when needed. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

9. Praise the student for raising their hand when appropriate based on the number of times the student can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the number of times required for reinforcement.

10. Converse with the student to explain (a) what the student is doing wrong (e.g., talking out, engaging in a behavior without raising their hand to get permission, etc.) and (b) what the student should be doing (e.g., raising their hand for permission to speak, or move about the room, etc.).

11. Make sure that reinforcement is not provided for unacceptable behavior(e.g., paying attention to the student only when they blurt out answers without being called on).

12. Praise the student for raising their hand when appropriate: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

13. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

14. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

15. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

16. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

16 Strategies to Help Learners Who Do Not Raise Their Hand to Ask a Question

Are you looking for strategies to help students who do not raise their hand to ask a question? If so, keep reading.

1. Assess the appropriateness of requiring the student to raise their hand. The student may not be capable or developmentally ready for hand-raising. Get the student to use other appropriate means of gaining attention.

2. Create rules for hand-raising (e.g., raise hand for permission to talk, do not leave seat, etc.). These rules should be consistent and followed by everyone in the class. Talk about the rules often.

3. Let logical consequences happen when the student does not raise their hand when appropriate (e.g., students who raise their hands will have their needs met, those students who fail to raise their hands will not have their needs met until they raise their hands, etc.).

4. Give the student an oral reminder to raise their hand (e.g., at the beginning of the day, at the beginning of the learning experience, when the student forgets, etc.).

5. Select a peer to model appropriate hand-raising for new students, students who do not raise their hands, etc.

6. Display hand-raising rules in the classroom.

7. Praise those students in the classroom who raise their hands when appropriate.

8. Recognize the student immediately upon raising their hand (e.g., let the student know when you see their hand, call upon the student, go to the student, etc.).

9. Be sure to let the student know that you will be with them as soon as possible when it is appropriate to be detained (e.g., when working with another student, speaking with another teacher, instructing a small group, etc.).

10. Do not grant the student’s request until their hand is raised.

11. Provide consistent expectations within the capacity and ability level of the student.

12. Give the student alternative, appropriate attention-seeking methods (e.g., display “help” sign on desk).

13. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

14. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

15. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

16. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

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