Pedagogue Blog

23 Strategies to Teach Learners Sequencing Skills

Are you looking for strategies to teach students sequencing skills? If so, keep reading.

1. Inspect the student’s comprehension of first, next, and last by having the student tell what happens during daily activities in first, next, and last order.

2. Give the student a recording of the story to listen to as they read along.

3. Get the student to write the main activities of stories as they read them.

4. Get the student to read one paragraph of a new account and make notes on the activities; then read the next section and make notes, etc.

5. Model making notes of a the series of activities as you read selections with the student.

6. Get the student to rephrase the series of activities in each paragraph read. The teacher can transcribe the paraphrased sequence, or the student can record it.

7. Assess the student’s auditory and visual short-term memory skills to ascertain which is stronger. Utilize the student’s stronger mode to enable the retention of sequential information.

8. Provide the student one task to perform at a time. Present the next task only when the student has successfully finished the prior task.

9. Teach the student to visualize information as if it were a movie; then play it back mentally when they need to verbalize it.

10. Get the student to practice repetition of information to increase short-term memory skills (e.g., repeating names, telephone numbers, dates of activities, etc.).

11. Teach the student to find the main idea of a story and causal relationships within the story to enable the recall of information in the correct order.

12. Get the student to practice remembering sequences by engaging in sequential learning activities that are purposeful to them (e.g., operating equipment, following recipes, opening a combination lock, etc.).

13. Utilize a flannel board to practice sequencing a familiar story or an ordinary action.

14. Get the student to be a peer tutor to teach another student a concept they have learned.

15. Give practice in sequencing using an app that gives the student instant feedback.

16. Make sure the student has mastery of reading ideas at each level before introducing a new skill level.

17. Make sure the student is not required to learn more information than they are capable of learning at any time.

18. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to hurry and commit errors.

19. Minimize the amount of information on a page if it is causing visual distractions for the student (e.g., have less print to read, isolate information that is presented to the student, etc.).

20. Find the student’s most efficient learning mode and use it continuously to increase the likelihood of comprehension (e.g., If the student fails to understand the information presented orally, present it in written form. If the student has difficulty comprehending written information, present it orally.).

21. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

22. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

23. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

22 Hacks to Support Learners Who Do Not Comprehend Content When They Read Silently

Are you looking for hacks to support students who do not comprehend when they read silently? If so, keep reading.

1. Get the student to outline reading content using the Outline Form.

2. Get the student to practice reading and following written instructions to enable comprehension (e.g., following a recipe, following instructions to put together a model, etc.).

3. Get the student to record what they read to enable comprehension by replaying and listening to the content read.

4. Prior to reading a selection, acquaint the student with the general content of the story (e.g., if the story is about elephants, brainstorm and discuss elephants to create a point of reference).

5. Get the student to dictate stories that are then put in print for them to read, placing emphasis on comprehension skills.

6. Compose paragraphs and short stories requiring reading skills the student is presently developing. The passages must be of interest to the student using their name, family members, friends, pets, and exciting experiences.

7. Do not require the student to learn more information than they are capable of learning at any time.

8. Outline reading content the student reads silently using words and phrases on their reading level.

9. Create a learning center for the student where an assortment of information is available in subject areas.

10. Make sure that the student’s knowledge of a particular skill is being assessed rather than the student’s capacity and ability to read instructions. Reading instructions to the student may enable their success.

11. Minimize distracting stimuli in their surroundings to enable the student’s capacity and ability to concentrate on what they are reading (e.g., place the student in the front row, give a table or “office” space away from distractions, etc.). This should be used as a way to lessen distractions, not as a punishment.

12. On occasions where reading orally with the student, pause at several points to discuss content read up to that point. Get the student to forecast what will happen next before proceeding.

13. Compose notes and letters to the student to give reading content that they will want to read for comprehension. Learners should be urged to write notes to each other at the same time each week.

14. Provide the student time to read a selection more than once. Place emphasis on comprehension rather than speed.

15. Teach the student to think about the reading selection and forecast what will happen next, prior to finishing the selection.

16. Get the student to outline, underline, or highlight essential points in reading content.

17. Teach the student to use context clues to find words and phrases they do not know.

18. Separate at several points while the student is reading silently to check for comprehension.

19. Utilize reading sequence learning materials with high interest (e.g., adventure, romance, mystery, sports, etc.) and low vocabulary.

20. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

21. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

22. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

15 Ways to Supports Learners Who Do Not Understand Text While Reading Silently

Are you looking for ways to support students who do not understand text while reading silently? If so, keep reading.

1. Make sure the student is practicing comprehension skills that are causally related to high interest reading learning activities (e.g., adventure, romance, mystery, sports, etc.).

2. Create a list of main points from the student’s reading content written on the student’s reading level.

3. Alter or adjust reading content to the student’s capacity and ability level.

4. Record complicated reading content for the student to listen to as they read along.

5. Get the student to take notes while reading to enable comprehension.

6. Teach the student meanings of abbreviations to assist in comprehending content read.

7. Get the student to underline or highlight essential points in reading content.

8. Get the student to orally rephrase content they have just read to assess their comprehension.

9. Spotlight essential points before the student reads the designated content silently.

10. Teach new vocabulary words prior to having the student read the content.

11. Get the student to read progressively longer segments of reading content to build comprehension skills (e.g., start with one paragraph and progress to several sections, short stories, chapters, etc.).

12. Give the student a quiet space (e.g., carrel, study booth, etc.) where they may go to take part in reading learning activities.

13. Make sure that the reading requirements of all subjects and tasks are within the capacity and ability level of the student. If they are not, adjust the reading content to the student’s capacity and ability level.

14. Teach the student when reading to look for keywords and main ideas that answer “Who, What, Where, On occasions where, How, and Why” (e.g., “Christopher Columbus sailed from Spain to discover the New World during the year 1492.”).

15. Provide the student high interest reading content on their capacity and ability level (e.g., comic books, adventure stories, etc.) requiring them to answer the questions “Who, What, Where, On occasions where, How, and Why.”

16. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

17. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

18. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

18 Strategies to Help Learners Who Do Not Understand Content When They Read Silently

Are you looking for strategies to help students who do not understand content when they read silently? If so, keep reading.

1. Pair the student with a peer to summarize content read to answer the questions “Who, What, Where, On occasions where, How, and Why.”

2. Get the student to read aloud when reading to themselves.

3. Utilize a sight-word vocabulary approach to teach the student keywords (e.g., circle underline, match, etc.) and phrases when reading directions and instructions.

4. Utilize lower grade-level texts as alternative reading content in subject areas.

5. Get the student to practice comprehension skills that are causally related to high interest reading learning activities .

6. Get the student to look for action words (e.g., sailed, discovered, founded, etc.).

7. Get the student to look for direction words (e.g., circle, underline, select, list, etc.).

8. Get the student to look for keywords (e.g., Christopher Columbus, Spain, New World, etc.).

9. After reading a selection, have the student finish a semantic map answering the questions “Who, What, Where, On occasions where, How, and Why.”

10. Get the student to read high interest signs, advertisements, notices, etc., from newspapers, magazines, movie promotions, etc., placing emphasis on comprehension skills.

11. Teach the student to find the main points in the content they have read to assess comprehension.

12. Get the student to answer in writing the questions “Who, What, Where, On occasions where, How, and Why” using the Flash Card Study Aid.

13. Get the student to read independently each day to practice reading skills.

14. Minimize the amount of information on a page (e.g., less print to read, fewer images to look at, etc.) if it is causing visual distractions for the student.

15. Make sure the student is reading content on their capacity and ability level.

16. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

17. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

18. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

18 Strategies to Help Learners Learn the Letters of the Alphabet

Are you looking for strategies to help students learn the letters of the alphabet? If so, keep reading.

1. Establish a system of reinforcers, either concrete (e.g., computer time, helper for the day, etc.) or informal (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.), to urge the student to learn the letters of the alphabet.

2. Give the student an alphabet strip at their desk to use as a reference when reading or performing tasks.

3. Every day, have the student print those letters of the alphabet they do not know.

4. Select a peer to work with the student on one letter of the alphabet daily (e.g., tracing the letter, printing the letter, identifying the letter in words in a paragraph, etc.).

5. Get the student to read and write friends’ first names that include letters the student does not recognize.

6. Present letters to the student as partners (e.g., Aa, Bb, Cc, Dd, etc.).

7. Get the student to say the letters of the alphabet in sequence. Repeat by rote several times a day.

8. Show the alphabet to the student on flash cards. This is an appropriate learning experience for a peer tutor to conduct with the student each day.

9. Find a letter the student does not know. Get the student to find the letter in all the words in a paragraph or on a page of a book.

10. Place each letter of the alphabet on an individual card. Get the student to collect and keep the letters they know with the goal to “own” all the letters of the alphabet.

11. Begin by teaching the names of letters in the student’s first name only. On occasions where the student has learned the letters in their first name, go on to the last name, parents’ names, etc.

12. Provide the student a word that begins with each letter of the alphabet (e.g., apple, bad, cat, etc.). Go over several of the terms each day, stressing the letters of the alphabet being learned.

13. Take every chance throughout the day to emphasize a designated letter for that day (e.g., find the letter when speaking, writing, reading, etc.).

14. Utilize daily drills to help the student memorize the alphabet.

15. Refrain from placing the student in awkward reading skills (e.g., reading aloud in a group, identifying that the student’s reading group is the lowest level, etc.).

16. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

20 Strategies to Help Learners Distinguish Between Comparable Letters and Words

Are you looking for strategies to help students distinguish comparable letters and words? If so, keep reading.

1. Get the student’s hearing reviewed if it has not been recently reviewed.

2. Every day, have the student practice those letters and words they cannot discriminate.

3. Take every chance throughout the day to emphasize a designated letter or word the student cannot distinguish (e.g., find the sound when speaking, writing, reading, etc.).

4. Make sure the student looks closely at word endings and beginnings to discriminate similar words (e.g., cap and cat).

5. Create a list of words the student cannot discriminate. Get the student and a peer to work together with flash cards to create the student’s capacity and ability to recognize the differences in the letters and words.

6. Record stories and paragraphs the student can listen to while reading along.

7. Get the student to read aloud to the teacher each day. Give evaluative feedback relative to their capacity and ability to discriminate letters and words.

8. Orally, correct the student as often as possible when they do not distinguish between letters and words, so they hear the correct version of the reading content.

9. Get the student to write those letters and words they have trouble distinguishing so they have a greater chance to discover the correct version.

10. Teach the student to use context clues in reading. These skills will be particularly helpful when they are unable to discriminate between letters and words.

11. Find a letter or word each day that the student has difficulty discriminating. Get the student to underline or highlight that letter or word every time they read it that day.

12. Utilize highlight markers (e.g., pink, and yellow) to have the student mark the letters and words in a passage they do not discriminate (e.g., all “m’s marked with the pink marker and all “n’s marked with the yellow tag).

13. Give the student an alphabet strip at their desk to use as a reference when reading or performing tasks.

14. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to hurry and not discriminate between similar letters and words.

15. Get the student to cut letters out of publications and glue the letters in sequence to make words, sentences, etc.

16. Make sure that the student’s knowledge of a particular skill is being assessed rather than the student’s capacity and ability to read instructions.

17. Make sure that the reading requirements of all subjects and tasks are within the capacity and ability level of the student. If they are not, adjust the reading content to the student’s capacity and ability level.

18. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

19. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

20. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

16 Hacks to Support Learners Who Do Not Read Independently

Are you looking for hacks to support students who do not read independently? If so, keep reading.

1. Establish a system of reinforcers, either concrete (e.g., extra computer time, helper for the day, etc.) or informal (e.g., smile, handshake, praise, etc.), to urge the student to be more successful in reading.

2. Get the student to dictate stories that are then put in print for them to read.

3. Give the student a quiet space (e.g., carrel, study booth, “office,” etc.) where they may go to take part in reading learning activities .

4. Read, or have someone read, high interest content to the student to promote their interest in reading.

5. Urge the student to read content with many illustrations and a limited amount of print. As the student shows success, slowly decrease the number of images, and increase the amount of print.

6. Urge parents to make reading content on the student’s interest and reading level available to the student at home.

7. Teach the student appropriate reading skills before expecting them to read independently.

8. Compose paragraphs and short stories for the student. The passages must be of interest to the student using their name, family members, friends, pets, and exciting experiences.

9. Establish a fixed or random time (e.g., a half-hour daily, an hour a week, etc.) for a “Read-In.” Everyone, the teacher included, selects a book that they like and reads it for pleasure.

10. Organize a survey of the student’s interests to give reading content in those interest areas.

11. Urge parents to read to their child at home and to have their child read to them. Urge parents to read for their own enjoyment to serve as a model for their child.

12. Get the student to write to the author of content they read to encourage an interest in reading more by the same author.

13. Give reading content in several settings (e.g., STEM books in the science center, art books in the art center, etc.).

14. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

15. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

16. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

16 Ways to Encourage Independent Reading

Are you looking for ways to encourage independent reading? If so, keep reading.

1. Give the student high interest reading content that is also short in length so the student can finish reading the content without difficulty.

2. Get the student to read high interest signs, advertisements, notices, etc., from newspapers, magazines, movie promotions, etc.

3. Urge reading by highlighting an author a month. The teacher should disseminate information about a writer, read books written by the author, and have more titles written by the author available for independent reading.

4. Create a reading area in the classroom that is attractive to the student (e.g., tent, bean bag chair, carpeted area, etc.).

5. When teaching a unit in a subject area, provide students with fiction or nonfiction books to share to spark their interest in reading.

6. Refrain from placing the student in awkward reading skills (e.g., reading aloud in a group, identifying that the student’s reading group is the lowest level, etc.).

7. Include predictable reading books in the class library. Predictability can make books more attractive to beginning readers and build confidence.

8. Make sure the student is reading content on their capacity and ability level.

9. Get the student to read lower grade-level stories to younger children to build their feelings of confidence relative to reading.

10. Give the student many high interest reading learning materials (e.g., comic books, magazines relating to sports, fashion, etc.).

11. Expose the student to learning materials with large print, as it can appear less intimidating to the student who does not select to read.

12. Alter or adjust reading learning materials to the student’s capacity and ability level.

13. Write periodic letters or notes to the student and urge them to write back.

14. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

15. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

16. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

16 Strategies to Help Learners Begin to Read Independently

Are you looking for strategies to help students begin to read independently? If so, keep reading.

1. Get the student to be a peer tutor to teach younger students reading or to read orally to younger students.

2. Pair the class with a lower grade-level class weekly. Let each student read to a younger child.

3. Make reading learning materials easily accessible to the student in the classroom.

4. Make visiting the library an enjoyable weekly experience.

5. Integrate listening skills/techniques as part of the daily routine (schedule) in reading class (e.g., listening center where the student reads along as a recording plays, the teacher reads to the student, students read to each other, etc.).

6. Give memberships in paperback book clubs to the student.

7. Urge interest in reading by having students share exciting things they have read.

8. Introduce a book sequence by an author that the student finds enjoyable. Make these books available for the student to read.

9. To urge reading, make sure that the student knows they are not reading for assessment purposes but for enjoyment.

10. Read excerpts of your favorite children’s books to entice the student to read the same book.

11. Urge the student to find books about various subjects being taught or discussed (e.g., when studying electricity, urge the student to read a book about Thomas Edison, etc.).

12. Support the student in discovering reading content that fits their interests and reading level. The student may not be comfortable or able to find books by themselves in the library.

13. Record reading content for the student to listen to as they read along.

14. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

15. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

16. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

26 Strategies to Help Learners Improve Their Reading Fluency

Are you looking for strategies to help students improve their reading fluency? If so, keep reading.

1. Give the student a dictionary and require them to find the definitions of those words they did not recognize.

2. Get the student to keep a list with definitions of those words they most regularly fail to recognize in various contexts.

3. Give the student a quiet space (e.g., carrel, study booth, etc.) where they may go to take part in reading learning activities .

4. Get the student to read aloud to the teacher each day. Give evaluative feedback.

5. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to hurry and fail to recognize words in a particular context.

6. Find words the student does not recognize in various contexts and put these words on flash cards. Get the student to match these words to the same words in sentences, paragraphs, short stories, etc.

7. Create a reading “window” for the student. The student moves the reading “window” down and across the page as they read.

8. Refrain from placing the student in awkward reading skills (e.g., reading aloud in a group, identifying that the student’s reading group is the lowest level, etc.).

9. Minimize the amount of information on a page if it is causing visual distractions for the student.

10. Make sure the student is reading content on their capacity and ability level.

11. Give the student large-print reading content to enable the student’s success in recognizing words in various contexts.

12. Record complicated reading content for the student to listen to as they read along.

13. Make the student read a selection each day that includes the vocabulary presently being studied.

14. Get the student to read short sentences to make it easier to recognize words in various contexts. As the student shows success, present longer sentences.

15. Compose paragraphs and short stories using those words the student most regularly fails to recognize in various contexts. The paragraphs that you use should be of interest to the student using their name, family members, friends, pets, and exciting experiences.

16. Utilize a lower grade-level text as alternative reading content in subject areas.

17. Minimize distracting stimuli in their surroundings to enable the student’s capacity and ability to concentrate on what they are reading (e.g., place the student on the front row, Give a table or “office” space away from distractions). This should be used as a way to lessen distractions, not as a punishment.

18. Get the student to list those words they most regularly fail to identify into groups such as people, places, food, animals etc., to help the student know those words in various contexts.

19. Compose notes and letters to the student to give reading content that includes words the student regularly has difficulty with.

20. Utilize daily drill learning activities to help the student memorize vocabulary words.

21. Teach the student to use context clues to find words not grasped.

22. Spotlight those words the student most regularly fails to recognize in various contexts.

23. Spotlight those words in reading content the student is unable to recognize. Get the student to find those words as they read them.

24. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

26. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

26. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

24 Ways to Help Learners Learn Word Comprehension Skills

Are you looking for ways to help students learn word comprehension skills? If so, keep reading.

1. Get the student to dictate stories that are put in print for them to read, placing emphasis on comprehension skills.

2. Compose paragraphs and short stories requiring skills the student is presently developing. The paragraphs that you use should be of interest to the student using their name, family members, friends, pets, and exciting experiences.

3. Prior to reading, tell the student what they are to find in the story (e.g., who are the main characters, what are the main activities, etc.).

4. Do not require the student to learn more information than they are capable of learning at any time.

5. Make sure that the student’s knowledge of a particular skill is being assessed rather than the student’s capacity and ability to read instructions. Reading instructions to the student can enable success.

6. Utilize a lower grade-level text as alternative reading content in subject areas.

7. Minimize distracting stimuli in their surroundings to enable the student’s capacity and ability to concentrate on what they are reading (e.g., place the student on the front row, Give a table or “office” space away from distractions). This should be used as a way to lessen distractions, not as a punishment.

8. Outline reading content for the student using words and phrases on their reading level.

9. Present new words and their meanings to the student before they read new content.

10. Provide the student time to read a selection more than once. Place emphasis on comprehension rather than speed.

11. Compose notes and letters to the student to give reading content that they will want to read for comprehension. Learners should be urged to pen notes at the same time each week.

12. Get the student to outline, underline, or highlight essential vocabulary in reading content.

13. Make sure the student underlines or circles words not grasped. These words will become the student’s vocabulary task for the week.

14. Utilize the current vocabulary words being studied by the student in the daily classroom conversation.

15. Teach the student to use context clues to find words not grasped.

16. Utilize a sight-word vocabulary approach to teach the student keywords (e.g., circle, underline, match, etc.) and phrases when reading directions and instructions.

17. Get the student to match vocabulary words with images representing the words.

18. Get the student to review vocabulary words by providing related clues. The student then identifies the vocabulary word.

19. Utilize reading sequence content with high interest (e.g., adventure, romance, mystery, sports, etc.) and low vocabulary.

20. Get the student to find words they do not comprehend. Get them to find the definitions of these words in the dictionary.

21. Make the student use new vocabulary words in follow-up tasks (e.g., have the student use these words on written tasks, crossword puzzles, etc.).

22. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

23. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

24. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

23 Hacks to Help Kids Acquire Word Comprehension Skills

Are you looking for hacks to help kids acquire word comprehension skills? If so, keep reading.

1. Make sure the student is reading content on their capacity and ability level.

2. Develop classroom games (e.g., Jeopardy®, Pictionary®, etc.) to review vocabulary words periodically.

3. Make sure the student learns dictionary skills to autonomously find meanings of words.

4. Make sure the student learns the meaning of all frequently used prefixes and suffixes.

5. Praise the student for looking up the definitions of words they do not understand.

6. Create a list of main points from the student’s reading content, written on the student’s reading level.

7. Alter or adjust reading content to the student’s capacity and ability level.

8. Get the student to list new or complicated words in categories such as people, food, animals, etc.

9. Get the student to teach new vocabulary to their peers (e.g., require the student to be creative by showing, acting out, drawing, or making an example of the word).

10. Get the student to match objects or images with sounds pronounced by that object (e.g., telephone ring, vacuum cleaner, etc.).

11. Establish a system of reinforcers either concrete (e.g., extra computer time, helper for the day, etc.) or informal (e.g., smile, handshake, praise, etc.) to urge the student to be more successful in reading.

12. Develop a written list of vocabulary words. Orally present a sentence with a “blank” and have the student determine what vocabulary word should be used.

13. Get the student to orally rephrase content that has just been read to assess comprehension.

14. Examine new vocabulary words periodically with the student (e.g., weekly, or bi-weekly).

15. Make it pleasant and positive for the student to ask the meanings or look up words they do not understand. Praise the student by assisting him/her, congratulating, etc.

16. Teach the student to forecast what will happen in the story based on new vocabulary words and the title page.

17. Teach the student to read for the main point in sentences, paragraphs, etc.

18. Make sure that the reading requirements of all subjects and tasks are within the capacity and ability level of the student. If they are not, adjust the reading content to the student’s capacity and ability level.

19. Get the student to record what they read to enable comprehension by replaying and listening to the content.

20. Prior to reading a selection, acquaint the student with the general content of the story to create a point of reference. Through this approach, introduce new vocabulary words.

21. Consider using AI to teach reading comprehension.

22. Consider using Alexa to teach reading skills.

23. Try using one of our many apps designed to teach literacy skills and help students with reading issues:

10 Apps That Teach Your Child to Read

7 Must-Have Apps to Make Learners Love Reading

7 Must-Have Phonics Apps and Tools

9 Reading Apps and Tools for the Elementary Classroom

The Tech Edvocate’s List of 24 Literacy Apps, Tools & Resources

10 Apps to Teach Children Early Literacy Skills

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