Pedagogue Blog

19 Ways to Encourage Learners to Behave Appropriately in the Presence of Other Educators

Are you looking for ways to encourage students to behave appropriately in the presence of other educators? If so, keep reading.

1. Make sure that the substitute authority figure is familiar with the behavioral support system used in the classroom (e.g., rules, point system, reinforcers, etc.).

2. Connect directly with the substitute authority figure, if possible, to disseminate information that will contribute to the student’s success.

3. Select a student(s) to be an assistant to the substitute authority figure during the day’s learning activities (e.g., the student(s) gives accurate information about the schedule of learning activities, behavioral support system, etc.).

4. Give the substitute authority figure detailed information on the learning activities and tasks.

5. Make sure the substitute authority figure follows all procedures indicated by the classroom teacher (e.g., academic learning activities, behavioral support system, etc.).

6. Get the substitute authority figure to give a written review of the day as feedback for the classroom teacher (e.g., learning activities finished, student behavior, absences, incidents about individual students, etc.).

7. Designate special or unique duties to be performed by other staff members in the school building (e.g., administering medication, feeding, toileting, etc.).

8. Get the student to record their behavior when a substitute authority figure is in the classroom.

9. Select a peer to work with the student to model appropriate behavior and to give information appropriate for success for the student.

10. If an aide works in the classroom, have the aide monitor the student’s behavior, give reinforcement, deliver instructions, etc.

11. If there is an aide in the classroom, have the aide work with the student on a one-to-one basis throughout the day.

12. Give the student an individualized schedule of daily activities. The schedule should be attached to the student’s desk or carried with them at all times.

13. Train the substitute authority figure to interact with the student regularly to give reinforcement, deliver instructions, give encouragement, etc.

14. Get the substitute authority figure to keep visibility to and from the student. The substitute authority figure should be able to see the student; the student should be able to see the substitute authority figure. Make eye contact possible at all times.

15. Give the student as many high interest learning activities as possible.

16. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

17. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

18. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

19. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

19 Strategies to Teach Learners to Behave Appropriately in the Presence of Other Educators

Are you looking for strategies to teach students to behave appropriately in the presence of other educators? If so, keep reading.

1. Develop an information packet for a substitute authority figure that includes all information pertaining to the classroom (e.g., student roster, class schedule, class rules, behavior management techniques, class helpers, etc.).

2. Make sure that the student knows that classroom rules and behavioral consequences are in effect when a substitute authority figure is in the classroom.

3. Indicate where all needed learning materials are located to maintain structure in the classroom.

4. Indicate several learning activities in which the student can participate after finishing their work for the day.

5. Indicate the names of several staff members and where they can be located in case the substitute authority figure should need some assistance.

6. Notify the substitute authority figure of the classroom rules and the consequences if the rules are not followed by the student.

7. Express the need for the substitute authority figure to keep consistent discipline while in and outside the classroom.

8. Notify the substitute authority figure of all privileges the students have both in and outside the classroom.

9. Get the student to work on practice work (e.g., work that has already been taught to the student and that they know how to do) to lessen frustration and feelings of failure.

10. Schedule 10 minutes at the beginning of the day for the substitute authority figure to create rapport with the students (e.g., introduce himself/herself to the class, learn the students’ names, talk about things the students enjoy doing, etc.).

11. Indicate to the student that the substitute authority figure is in charge of the classroom at all times.

12. Plan a fun educational learning experience (e.g., computer games) during the day to give an incentive for the student to remain on-task and behave appropriately.

13. Designate a special job for the student to perform when there is a substitute authority figure in the classroom (e.g., substitute teacher’s assistant, line leader, class monitor, etc.). Notify the substitute authority figure of this “special job.”

14. Get the substitute authority figure to present instructions in an assortment of ways (e.g., orally, written, etc.).

15. Request a substitute authority figure who has the appropriate skills to handle problem behavior and special needs students.

16. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

17. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

18. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

19. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

22 Methods for Motivating Learners to Behave Appropriately in a Small Group Setting

Are you looking for methods to motivate students to behave appropriately in a small group setting? If so, keep reading.

1. Put the student in group learning activities they prefer. As the student shows success, slowly require the student to take part in less desirable learning activities.

2. Give the student alternative ways to perform a group task and let the student select the most desirable (e.g., a written paragraph task may be accomplished by writing a note to a friend, writing about a recent experience, describing a favorite pastime, etc.).

3. Let the student take part in one cooperative learning experience they prefer. Make the student take part in more group learning activities as they experience success.

4. Plan group learning activities when the student is most likely to be successful (e.g., before recess rather than immediately after recess, after the first individual task of the day has been finished to create productive behavior, etc.).

5. Plan alternative individual learning activities if the student is unlikely to be successful (e.g., if the schedule has been changed, if holidays or special activities have stimulated the student and make successful group interaction unlikely, etc.).

6. Let the student join the group after the learning experience has begun if they are unable to participate properly at the beginning of the cooperative learning experience.

7. Place the student’s desk or work area so they work near other students but is not visually distracted by them (e.g., turn the student’s desk away from other students, etc.).

8. Let the student leave a cooperative learning experience and return to independent work when they can no longer be successful in the cooperative learning experience (e.g., as an alternative to disrupting the group, fighting, etc.).

9. Teach the student to think before acting (e.g., they should ask themselves, “What is happening?” “What am I doing?” “What should I do?” “What will be best for me?”).

10. Get the student to question all directions, explanations, or instructions they do not understand.

11. Assess the appropriateness of the designated task to ascertain (a) if the task is too easy, (b) if the task is too complicated, and (c) if the duration of time scheduled is sufficient.

12. Connect with parents to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for participating in small academic group situations at school.

13. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., working properly with peers) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

14. Converse with the student to explain (a) what the student is doing wrong (e.g., failing to take part) and (b) what the student should be doing (e.g., talking, taking turns, sharing, etc.).

15. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior in a small academic group setting: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

16. Create classroom rules: • Complete every assignment. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. • Raise your hand. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

17. Praise those students in the classroom who demonstrate appropriate behavior in a small academic group setting.

18. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior in a small academic group setting based on the duration of time they can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for reinforcement.

19. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

20. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

21. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

22. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

20 Techniques for Encouraging Learners to Behave Appropriately in a Small Group Setting

Are you looking for encouraging students to behave appropriately in a small group setting? If so, keep reading.

1. Make sure the student is productive and accurate in performing individual tasks before placing them in a cooperative learning experience.

2. Make sure that the student can follow classroom rules and expectations independently before placing them in a cooperative learning experience.

3. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Fear of failure may cause the student to be reluctant to take part in small group situations.

4. Assist the student in learning to be happy with their best effort rather than some arbitrary measure of success. Success is measured individually according to capacity and ability level, and progress of any kind is a measure of success.

5. Group the student with peers who will be appropriate role models and are likely to enable the student’s academic and behavioral successes.

6. Group the student with group members who are least likely to be menacing (e.g., younger students, students just learning a skill the student has already learned, etc.).

7. Make sure the student knows the instructions for the cooperative learning experience (e.g., give instructions in an assortment of ways, make sure that the student knows their role, go over the rules for group behavior before the learning experience begins, etc.).

8. Take the student away from the group if their behavior is unacceptable.

9. Make sure the student has all the needed learning materials to perform their role in the group (e.g., paper, pencil, art supplies, reference learning materials, etc.).

10. Make sure the student has enough room to work successfully (e.g., distance from other students, room for all learning materials, etc.).

11. Make sure the student is actively involved in the group situation (e.g., call on the student regularly, Designate the student a responsibility such as a teacher’s assistant, have them be the group leader, etc.).

12. Make sure the academic and social requirements of the group situation are within the student’s capacity and ability level.

13. Assist the student in getting to know group members before requiring group participation (e.g., introduce the students to one another, let the students have unstructured free time together, etc.).

14. Minimize distracting stimuli that could interfere with the student’s success in a cooperative learning experience (e.g., give enough room to move without physical contact, keep noise level at a minimum, keep movement in their surroundings to a minimum, etc.).

15. Plan group learning activities so the teacher can spend uninterrupted time with the group.

16. Plan group learning activities as part of the student’s daily routine (schedule) (i.e., group learning activities should happen on a regularly scheduled basis so the student will be prepared and know what to expect).

17. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

18. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

19. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

20. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

18 Tactics for Teaching Learners to Behave Appropriately in a Small Group Setting

Are you looking for strategies to teach students to behave appropriately in a small group setting? If so, keep reading.

1. Do not force the student to take part in group situations.

2. Select a peer, paraprofessional, friend, etc., to sit/work directly with the student (e.g., in various settings such as art, music, or P.E. or various learning activities such as tutoring, group projects, running errands in the school building, recess, etc.).

3. Ask the student questions that cannot be answered yes or no.

4. Ask the student a question when they are most likely to be able to respond successfully (e.g., something in which the student is interested, when the teacher is sure the student knows the answer, etc.).

5. Try several groups to ascertain the situation in which the student is most successful.

6. Get peers to invite the student to take part in school or extracurricular learning activities.

7. Ask the student to be the leader of a cooperative learning experience if they possess mastery or an interest in the learning experience.

8. Let the student be present during group learning activities without requiring active participation.

9. Get the student to work with one or two other group members. As the student becomes more comfortable, slowly increase the size of the group.

10. Show respect for the student’s opinions, responses, suggestions, etc.

11. Provide the student the chance to pick a topic or learning experience for the group to work on together.

12. Go over group rules and expectations at the beginning of each cooperative learning experience.

13. Provide the student the chance to select a cooperative learning experience and the group members (e.g., along with the teacher, decide what the learning experience will be and decide what individual group members will do, etc.).

14. Designate the student a role to perform in the cooperative learning experience that they can perform successfully (e.g., secretary, researcher, group behavior monitor, etc.).

15. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

16. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

17. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

18. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

22 Genius Ways to Motivate Learners to Behave Themselves in Small Groups

Are you looking for genius ways to motivate students to behave themselves in small groups? If so, keep reading.

1. Minimize distracting stimuli that could interfere with the student’s success in a cooperative learning experience (e.g., give enough room to move without physical contact, keep noise level at a minimum, keep movement in their surroundings to a minimum, etc.).

2. Plan group learning activities as part of the student’s daily routine (schedule) (i.e., group learning activities should happen on a regularly scheduled basis so the student will be prepared and know what to expect).

3. Plan group learning activities so the teacher can spend uninterrupted time with the group.

4. Put the student in group learning activities they prefer. As the student shows success, slowly require the student to take part in less desirable learning activities.

5. Give the student alternative ways to perform a group task and let the student select the most desirable (e.g., a written paragraph task may be accomplished by writing a note to a friend, writing about a recent experience, describing a favorite pastime, etc.).

6. Let the student take part in one cooperative learning experience they prefer. Make the student take part in more group learning activities as they experience success.

7. Plan group learning activities when the student is most likely to be successful (e.g., before recess rather than immediately after recess, after the first individual task of the day has been finished to create productive behavior, etc.).

8. Plan alternative individual learning activities if the student is unlikely to be successful (e.g., if the schedule has been changed, if holidays or special activities have stimulated the student and make successful group interaction unlikely, etc.).

9. Let the student join the group after the learning experience has begun if they are unable to participate properly at the beginning of the cooperative learning experience.

10. Place the student’s desk or work area, so they work near other students but are not visually distracted by them (e.g., turn the student’s desk away from other students, etc.).

11. Let the student leave a cooperative learning experience and return to independent work when they can no longer be successful in the cooperative learning experience (e.g., as an alternative to disrupting the group, fighting, etc.).

12. Teach the student to think before acting (e.g., they should ask themselves, “What is happening?” “What am I doing?” “What should I do?” “What will be best for me?”).

13. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for participating in group situations at school.

14. Draft an agreement with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., making short, appropriate remarks and speaking at appropriate times) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

15. Talk with the student to explain(a) what the student is doing wrong and (b) what the student should be doing (e.g., talking, taking turns, playing, sharing, etc.).

16. Create classroom rules: • Complete every assignment. • Remain in your seat. • Finish tasks. • Meet task expectations. • Raise your hand. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

17. Praise the student for working in a group situation: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

18. Praise other students in the classroom for working properly in a group situation.

19. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

20. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

21. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

22. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

19 Ways to Encourage Learners to Behave Themselves in Small Groups

Are you looking for ways to encourage students to behave themselves in small groups ? If so, keep reading.

1. Designate the student a role to perform in the cooperative learning experience that they can perform successfully (e.g., secretary, researcher, group behavior monitor, etc.).

2. Make sure the student is productive and accurate in performing individual tasks before placing them in a cooperative learning experience.

3. Go over group rules and expectations at the beginning of each cooperative learning experience.

5. Make sure that the student can follow classroom rules and expectations independently before 4 them in a cooperative learning experience.

6. Assist the student in learning to be happy with their best effort rather than some arbitrary measure of success. Success is measured individually according to capacity and ability level, and progress of any kind is a measure of success.

7. Make sure the student knows the instructions for the cooperative learning experience (e.g., give instructions in an assortment of ways, make sure that the student knows their role, go over the rules for group behavior before the learning experience begins, etc.).

8. Make sure the student has all the needed learning materials to perform their role in the group (e.g., paper, pencil, art supplies, reference learning materials, etc.).

9. Group the student with peers who will be appropriate role models and are likely to enable the student’s academic and behavioral successes.

10. Group the student with group members who are least likely to be menacing (e.g., younger students, students just learning a skill the student has already learned, etc.).

11. Make sure the student has enough room to work successfully (e.g., distance from other students, room for all learning materials, etc.).

12. Make sure the student is actively involved in the group situation (e.g., call on the student regularly, Designate the student a responsibility such as a teacher’s assistant, have them be the group leader, etc.).

13. Take the student away from the group if their behavior is unacceptable.

14. Make sure the academic and social requirements of the group situation are within the student’s capacity and ability level.

15. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too easy, (b) if the task is too complicated, and (c) if the duration of time scheduled for the task is sufficient.

16. Assist the student in getting to know group members before requiring group participation (e.g., introduce the students to one another, let the students have unstructured free time together, etc.).

13. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

14. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

15. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

16. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

19 Strategies to Teach Learners to Behave Themselves in Small Groups

Are you looking for strategies to teach students to behave themselves in small groups? If so, keep reading.

1. Do not force the student to participate in group situations.

2. Select a peer, paraprofessional, friend, etc., to sit/work directly with the student (e.g., in various settings such as art, music, or P.E. or in various learning activities such as tutoring, group projects, running errands in the school building, recess, etc.).

3. Reward or urge other students for participation in group situations.

4. Give the student responsibility for helping a peer in group situations.

5. Give the student duties in group situations so others might view the student positively.

6. Ask the student a question when they are most likely to be able to respond successfully (e.g., when discussing a topic in which the student is interested, when the teacher is sure the student knows the answer, etc.).

7. Attempt several groupings to ascertain the situation in which the student is most comfortable.

8. Get peers to invite the student to take part in school or extracurricular learning activities.

9. Get the student to lead a cooperative learning experience when they possess mastery or an interest in the learning experience.

10. Let the student be present during group learning activities without requiring active participation. Require more involvement over time as the student becomes more active in group situations.

11. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Fear of failure may cause the student to be reluctant to take part in group situations.

12. Get the student to work with one or two other group members. As the student becomes more comfortable, slowly increase the size of the group.

13. Show respect for the student’s opinions, responses, suggestions, etc.

14. Give the student the chance to pick a topic or learning experience for the group to work on together.

15. Give the student the chance to select a cooperative learning experience and the group members (e.g., along with the teacher, decide what the learning experience will be and decide what individual group members will do, etc.).

16. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

17. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

18. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

19. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

16 Ways to Encourage Learners to Behave Appropriately While Moving with Groups

Are you looking for ways to encourage students to behave appropriately while moving with groups? If so, keep reading.

1. Give the student an easily grasped list of consequences for unacceptable behavior when moving with a group.

2. Show/model for the student moving properly with a group.

3. Assess the appropriateness of the expectation of moving with a group to ascertain (a) if the task is too easy, (b) if the task is too complicated, and (c) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

4. Converse with the student to explain (a) what they are doing wrong (e.g., running, pushing peers, etc.) and (b) what they must be doing (e.g., walking without touching peers).

5. Create rules for moving properly with a group: • Walk in the halls. • Go directly from one area to another. • Talk quietly in the halls. • Walk on the right side of the hall. • Utilize an appropriate pathway. Examine rules often. Praise students for following the rules.

6. State clearly the manner in which you expect the student to act before going out in public or to a place where they have never been before.

7. Separate the line regularly to enable the student’s success when moving with a group.

8. Get the students to walk in pairs when moving as a group.

9. Separate the student from the peer who stimulates their unacceptable behavior.

10. Form a second line or group for those students who move at a slower pace.

11. Write a contract with the student stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., walking properly in a group) and which reinforcement will be implemented when the agreement has been met.

12. Inform the student before leaving the classroom of the rules for walking in a group (e.g., walk behind the person in front of you, keep hands to yourself, walk quietly, etc.).

13. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

14. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

15. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

16. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

16 Strategies to Teach Learners to Behave Appropriately While Moving with Groups

Are you looking for strategies to teach students to behave appropriately while moving with groups? If so, keep reading.

1. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for moving properly with a group at school.

2. Let logical consequences happen as a result of the student’s unacceptable behavior(e.g., excessive physical contact may cause people to remain away from the student or may result in pushing, shoving, etc.).

3. Get the student to be a line leader, line monitor, etc., when moving with a group.

4. State clearly the expectations for appropriate behavior when moving with a group.

5. Select a peer to model appropriate movement with a group for the student.

6. Praise the student for demonstrating appropriate behavior when moving with a group: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

7. Praise those students who demonstrate appropriate behavior when moving with a group.

8. Praise the student for moving properly with a group based on the duration of time the student can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for reinforcement.

9. Get the student to walk with arms crossed, against their side, hands in pockets, etc., if touching others is a problem.

10. Give constant, positive reinforcement for appropriate behavior. Ignore as many unacceptable behaviors as possible.

11. Praise the student for walking at the same pace as other students when moving with a group.

12. Get the student to walk alone, behind the group, beside the teacher, etc., when they display unacceptable behavior when moving with a group.

13. Consider using a classroom management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

14. Consider using an adaptive behavior management app. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

15. Consider using Alexa to help the student learn to behave appropriately. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

16. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

17 Hacks to Motivate Learners to Be Prepared for Learning Experiences

Are you looking for hacks to motivate students to be prepared for learning experiences? If so, keep reading.

1. Gather anecdotal information on the student’s tardy behavior. If a trend can be determined, remove the student from the situation and/or help the student be encouraged.

2. Make sure the student is properly placed according to their capacity and ability level in those classes in which they are enrolled.

3. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Repeated failure may cause the student to avoid being on time for learning activities that are competitive.

4. Teach the student how to use a calendar to acknowledge upcoming learning activities that are not part of the daily routine (schedule) (e.g., Tuesday at 12:00, field trip to the zoo, etc.).

5. Provide instructions in a compassionate rather than a menacing manner (e.g., “Please come to your reading group now.” rather than “You had better come to your reading group or else!” etc.).

6. Provide the student a special responsibility before the group meets (e.g., sharpening pencils, arranging chairs, passing out books, etc.).

7. Utilize a timer to help the student know how much time they have to follow through with instructions.

8. Always treat the student with the utmost respect. Talk objectively at all times.

9. Do not embarrass the student by giving them orders, requirements, etc., in front of others.

10. Make sure the student knows how to tell time and has a comprehension of their daily routine (schedule).

11. Give the student a schedule of activities for the day to keep at their desk. Make notes of any special learning materials needed for a learning experience.

12. Make sure the student has a working watch or clock available to encourage them to start a learning experience.

13. Along with instruction, give an incentive statement (e.g., “On occasions where you come to your reading group, you may pass out the books.” “Please come to your reading group early to help arrange the chairs.” etc.).

14. Let logical consequences happen as a result of the student’s failure to be ready for a learning experience at a specific time (e.g., miss a school assembly, miss the bus, late for class, etc.).

15. Teach the student organizational skills (e.g., before leaving the classroom, make sure learning materials are put away; bring all the appropriate learning materials; arrive five minutes early; etc.).

16. Teach the student to use a pocket calendar to record specific times, places, and learning activities that need to be remembered.

17. Consider using an education app to help the student sharpen their organizational skills. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

18 Strategies to Encourage Learners to Be Prepared for Learning Experiences

Are you looking for strategies to encourage students to be prepared for learning experiences? If so, keep reading.

1. Ascertain why the student is not ready for learning activities at a specific time.

2. Ask the student why they are not ready for learning activities at a specific time. The student may have the most accurate perception as to why they are not ready for learning activities at a specific time.

3. Assist the student in understanding that it is permissible to leave work unfinished and return to it at a later time.

4. Get the student to document their attendance at the end of each learning experience.

5. Ascertain if there are aspects of learning activities that the student dislikes. Remove, lessen, or modify the unpleasant aspects of learning activities to urge the student to be ready for and take part in learning activities.

6. Make the student responsible for time missed (e.g., if the student misses five minutes of a learning experience, they must make up the time during recess, lunch, or other desired learning activities ).

7. Give the student a schedule of daily activities so that they will know what learning activities to attend and their times.

8. Make sure that the student is successful in school-related and social learning activities. The student will be more likely to be ready for learning activities in which they experience success.

9. Provide the student a schedule of classes that must be signed by every instructor to document their promptness.

10. Make sure that other students do not make it unpleasant for the student to attend learning activities.

11. Make sure the student has all the appropriate learning materials for learning activities.

12. Record promptness with the student.

13. Begin learning activities with a task that is highly reinforcing to the student.

14. Assess appropriateness of the level of difficulty of tasks in comparison with the student’s capacity and ability.

15. Give the student many chances for high interest learning activities as possible.

16. Give the student academic learning activities in the most attractive manner possible.

17. Make the student a leader of the learning experience or group.

18. Consider using an education app to help the student sharpen their organizational skills. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

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