Pedagogue Blog

26 Tips for Getting Kids to Obey Your Verbal Instructions

Are you looking for tips for getting kids to obey your verbal instructions? If so, keep reading.

1. Select a peer to model appropriate listening to and following oral instructions for the student.

2. Make sure the student is paying attention when they are told to do something. Get the student to make eye contact and repeat the information to check for comprehension.

3. Stop the student from becoming overstimulated by a learning experience (e.g., frustrated, angry, etc.).

4. Give clearly stated oral instructions (e.g., make the instructions as simple and concrete as possible).

5. Make sure that oral instructions are given at the level at which the student can be successful (e.g., two-step or three-step instructions are not given to students who can only successfully follow one-step instructions).

6. Give instructions on a one-to-one basis before assigning a task.

7. Give supplemental instructions in the student’s preferred learning style (e.g., visual, auditory, etc.).

8. Complete the first problem or problems with the student to make sure that they follow the oral instructions accurately.

9. Give the student a written copy of oral instructions.

10. Converse with the student to explain (a) what they are doing wrong (e.g., ignoring oral instructions) and (b) what they must be doing (e.g., listening to and following through when given oral instructions).

11. Minimize distracting stimuli to increase the student’s capacity and ability to follow oral instructions (e.g., place the student on the front row, give a carrel or “office” space away from distractions, etc.). This should be used as a way to lessen distractions, not as a punishment.

12. Make sure that oral instructions are delivered in a nonmenacing manner (e.g., positive voice, facial expression, language used, etc.).

13. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to hurry to begin the task without oral instructions.

14. Minimize the emphasis on early conclusion. Hurrying to finish tasks may cause the student to fail to follow instructions.

15. Praise the student for following oral instructions: (a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

16. Get the student to carry out one step of the oral instructions at a time, checking with the teacher to make sure that each step is successfully followed before trying the next.

17. Praise the student for following oral instructions based on the duration of time they can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the duration of time required for reinforcement.

18. Praise those students in the classroom who follow oral instructions.

19. Stand in proximity to the student when giving oral instructions.

20. Make the student wait until the teacher gives them a signal to begin a task (e.g., give a hand signal, ring a bell, etc.).

21. Consider using a classroom management app to help the student learn to follow your verbal instructions. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using Alexa to help you with classroom management. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

23. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

21. Consider using a classroom management app to help the student follow directions and instructions . Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using Alexa to help you with classroom management. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

23. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

24. Read this article that we wrote on developing listening comprehension skills.

25. Read this article that we wrote explaining why verbal comprehension skills are important to academic success.

26. Read this article that we wrote on what you should do when your child struggles with verbal comprehension.

26 Ways to Get Disobedient Kids to Follow Verbal Instructions

Are you looking for ways to get disobedient kids to follow directions? If so, keep reading.

1. Get the student to question any oral directions, explanations, and instructions they do not understand.

2. Give constant, positive reinforcement for appropriate behavior. Ignore as many unacceptable behaviors as possible.

3. Get the student to record directions, explanations, and instructions. Let them replay information as often as needed.

4. Get the student’s hearing reviewed if it has not been recently reviewed.

5. Make sure that the student knows the relationship between unacceptable behavior and the consequences that follow (e.g., failing to listen to and follow instructions during football practice may result in being benched for a game).

6. Get the student to orally repeat directions, explanations, and instructions after they have been given to reinforce retention.

7. Inform the student that instructions will only be given once and that you will not remind them to follow the instructions.

8. Provide consistency in the format of oral instructions.

9. Let logical consequences happen due to the student’s failure to listen to and follow instructions (e.g., school or class detention, missed task, etc.).

10. Make sure that all instructions, questions, explanations, and instructions are delivered in a clear, concise manner; at an appropriate pace; and loudly enough for the student to hear.

11. Show instructions in both written and oral form.

12. Make sure that oral instructions are delivered in a compassionate rather than menacing manner (e.g., “Will you please . . .” or “You need . . . ” rather than “You better . . .” or “If you don’t . . .” ).

13. Make sure the student achieves success when following oral instructions.

14. Make sure the student has all the learning materials needed to finish the task/learning experience .

15. Get the student to practice oral direction following on nonacademic tasks (e.g., recipes, games, etc.).

16. Give alternatives for the traditional format of presenting oral instructions (e.g., record instructions, summarize instructions, instructions given by peers, etc.).

17. Get the student to repeat instructions or give an interpretation after receiving oral instructions.

18. Make sure the student knows that you expect them to listen to you (e.g., by saying, “William, it is essential that you listen carefully to what I have to say. The book report is due on Monday.”).

19. Talk regularly with the student to help them follow oral instructions for the learning experience.

20. Make instructions important to the student. Attempt to relate instructions to past experiences.

21. Consider using a classroom management app to help the student learn to follow your verbal instructions. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using Alexa to help you with classroom management. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

23. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

21. Consider using a classroom management app to help the student follow directions and instructions . Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using Alexa to help you with classroom management. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

23. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

24. Read this article that we wrote on developing listening comprehension skills.

25. Read this article that we wrote explaining why verbal comprehension skills are important to academic success.

26. Read this article that we wrote on what you should do when your child struggles with verbal comprehension.

26 Strategies to Help Learners Who Fail to Follow Verbal Instructions and Directions

Are you looking for strategies to help students who fail to follow verbal directions and instructions? If so, keep reading.

1. Provide visibility to and from the student. The teacher and the student should be able to see each other. Make eye contact possible at all times when giving oral instructions.

2. Assess the clarity and quality of oral directions, explanations, and instructions given to the student.

3. Designate a peer to work with the student to help them follow oral instructions.

4. Provide instructions, explanations, and information using vocabulary that is within the student’s level of comprehension.

5. Refrain from placing the student in situations that require listening for an expanded duration of time such as lectures, seminars, etc. Give the information for the student through a recording or lecture notes.

6. Be firm, fair, and consistent, expecting the student to listen to and follow instructions. Do not Let the student fail to follow instructions one time and expect instructions to be followed the next time.

7. Ensure the student has heard what was said by having them give acknowledgment (e.g., by saying, “Okay!” “Will do!” etc.).

8. Tell the student that it is their behavior that determines whether consequences are positive or negative.

9. Connect clearly to the student when it is time to listen to oral instructions.

10. Support the student in performing their duties. As they show success following oral instructions, slowly decrease the assistance and require the student to independently assume more responsibility.

11. Provide a predetermined signal (e.g., clapping hands, turning lights off and on, etc.) before giving oral instructions.

12. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the student’s progress. The parents may reinforce the student at home for following oral instructions at school.

13. Show directions, explanations, and instructions as they are presented orally (e.g., use the smartboard to work a problem for the student, begin playing a game with the student, etc.).

14. Show the steps of oral instructions as they are delivered to enable the likelihood that the student will follow the instructions accurately.

15. Create instruction-following tasks/learning activities (e.g., informal learning activities designed to have the student carry out oral instructions in steps with increasing degrees of difficulty).

16. Assess the visual and auditory stimuli in their surroundings. Ascertain the number of stimuli the student can tolerate. Remove unnecessary stimuli from their surroundings.

17. Do not criticize when correcting the student; be honest yet compassionate. Never cause the student to feel negatively about themselves.

18. Do not give instructions to the student from across the classroom. Go to the student, get their full attention, and tell the student what they are to do. As the student’s capacity and ability to follow oral instructions increases, slowly increase the distance of communication.

19. Provide oral instructions before handing out learning materials.

20. Provide the student with short directions, explanations, and instructions to follow. As the student shows success, slowly increase the length of the directions, explanations, and instructions.

21. Consider using a classroom management app to help the student follow directions and instructions . Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

22. Consider using Alexa to help you with classroom management. Click here to read an article that we wrote on the subject.

23. Click here to learn about six bonus strategies for challenging problem behaviors and mastering classroom management.

24. Read this article that we wrote on developing listening comprehension skills.

25. Read this article that we wrote explaining why verbal comprehension skills are important to academic success.

26. Read this article that we wrote on what you should do when your child struggles with verbal comprehension.

12 Ways to Help Kids Remember Sequences

Are you looking for ways to help kids remember sequences? If so, keep reading.

1. Reward other students in the classroom for following appropriate steps in tasks.

2. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too easy, (b) if the task is too complicated, and (c) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

3. Utilize written/oral repetition to aid in the retention of information.

4. Inform the student what to listen for when being given instructions or receiving information.

5. Separate a sequence into units and have the student learn one unit at a time.

6. Teach the student to use environmental means to remember sequences (e.g., calendar, dictionary, etc.).

7. Teach the student to use associative signals or mnemonic devices to remember sequences.

8. Get the student to repeat to themselves information just heard to help them remember the essential facts.

9. Urge the student to use a smartphone for phone numbers, reminders, and messages.

10. Urge the student to use visual reminders (e.g., attach a note to a backpack, place a self-adhesive note on the inside of their locker, etc.).

11. Get the student to work with a peer who can successfully follow the appropriate steps in tasks.

12. Consider using an education app to help the student enhance their memory. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

21 Hacks for Kids Who Have Difficulty to Remember Sequences

Are you looking for hacks for kids who have difficulty remembering sequences? If so, keep reading.

1. Praise the student for remembering sequences based on the number of times they can be successful. As the student shows success, slowly increase the length of the sequence required for reinforcement.

2. Praise the student for recalling sequences: ( a) give the student a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.) or (b) give the student an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

3. Get the student to orally repeat directions, explanations, and instructions after they have been given to reinforce retention.

4. Get the student to be responsible for helping a peer remember sequences.

5. Provide a consistent daily routine (schedule) in the classroom.

6. Provide the student with short sequences (e.g., two components, three components, etc.) to remember. As the student shows success, slowly increase the length of the sequence.

7. Stop annoying or anxiety-producing situations from happening (e.g., do not place the student in a competitive situation that requires sequencing skills).

8. Teach and practice various strategies to remember steps in a task: • Repetition, • Mnemonic, • Acronym, • Association.

9. Do not require the student to learn more information than they are capable of remembering at any time.

10. Teach and have the student practice listening for crucial information when they are being given instructions or receiving information (e.g., write down main points, ideas, step-by-step instructions; etc.).

11. Provide information to the student on a one-to-one basis or use a peer tutor.

12. Create a rule (e.g., your time and follow sequential instructions). This rule should be consistent and followed by everyone in the classroom. Talk about the rule often and reward the student for following the rule.

13. Let the student record information from lectures and make notes from these recordings.

14. Give written reminders of task sequences.

15. Assess the degree of task difficulty to ascertain whether the student will require additional information, sequencing models, time, assistance, etc., before starting a task.

16. Get the student to find the main characters, sequence the activities, and report the outcome of a short story they have just read.

17. Show new skills. Let the student practice hands-on learning of new skills.

18. Make instructions important to the student. Attempt to relate instructions to past experiences.

19. Get the student to sequence the learning activities that occurred during a field trip or special event.

20. Praise those students in the classroom who remember sequences.

21. Consider using an education app to help the student enhance their memory. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

21 Memory Tips for Forgetful Kids

Are you looking for memory tips for forgetful kids? If so, keep reading.

1. Support the student in developing a chart to follow that will let them finish all tasks.

2. Separate at several points during the presentation of information to verify the student’s comprehension.

3. Urge the student to eat a balanced diet and get plenty of rest to enable their memory.

4. Get the student to use electronic reminders to assist them in following a routine (schedule) (e.g., a programmable watch, computer programs, voice mail, etc.).

5. Give the student environmental signals and prompts (e.g., lists of jobs to perform, schedule of daily activities, bell, timer, etc.).

6. Provide a consistent sequence of learning activities to enable the student’s success (e.g., the student has math every day at one o’clock, recess at two o’clock, etc.).

7. Urge the student to create a routine (schedule) for themselves by developing a weekly schedule and a weekend schedule. Support the student in developing a chart for daily tasks to be finished.

8. Give the student frequent chances to say sequences throughout the day to enable memory skills.

9. Let the student highlight sequential information in written learning materials.

10. Train the student to imagine the steps required to finish a task before starting that task.

11. Make sure the learning activities in which the student engages are not too complicated for him/her.

12. Designate a task that involves instant, short-term steps.

13. Teach the student to make reminders for themselves (e.g., notes, lists, etc.).

14. Assist the student in using memory aids.

15. Get the student to keep notes, written reminders, etc., to remember sequences.

16. Select various people (e.g., peer, counselor, paraprofessional, etc.) to help the student improve their memory skills.

17. Make it pleasant and positive for the student to ask questions about things they do not understand. Praise the student by assisting, congratulating, etc.

18. Train the student to post needed sequential information in a readily accessible place (e.g., folder, on desktop, in front of the textbook, etc.).

19. Urge the student to practice patience and follow the appropriate steps in tasks. If the student is impatient, they are more likely to omit appropriate steps in a sequence.

20. Get the student to practice remembering sequences by engaging in sequential learning activities that are purposeful to them (e.g., operating equipment, following recipes, opening a combination lock, etc.).

21. Consider using an education app to help the student enhance their memory. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

21 Strategies to Help Learners Who Find It Difficult to Remember Sequences

Are you looking for strategies to help students who find it difficult to remember sequences? If so, keep reading.

1. Get the student to keep a notebook in which they keep notes regarding appropriate sequential information (e.g., lists of things to do, schedule of activities, days of the week, months of the year, etc.).

2. Give the student a schedule of daily activities for each day’s learning activities at school.

3. Utilize several modalities to accommodate more than one learning style (e.g., visual, auditory, tactile, etc.) when presenting instructions/instructions, explanations, and instructional content.

4. Include the student in learning activities in which they can be successful and activities that will help them feel excellent about themselves. Repeated failures result in frustration and impatience.

5. Give the student additional learning activities that require the use of sequences to enable their capacity and ability to remember sequences.

6. Clarify instructions and expectations before assigning a task.

7. Get the student to question any directions, explanations, or instructions they do not understand.

8. Take into account the student’s age and experience before expecting them to remember long sequences of learning activities.

9. Urge the student to ask people to repeat portions of a conversation he or she was unable to follow.

10. Train the student to ask themselves questions (e.g., “What’s next?”) to keep themselves focused on tasks/projects.

11. Urge the student to avoid ingesting any substance (e.g., drugs, alcohol, cold remedies, etc.) that might further alter their capacity and ability to remember.

12. Train the student to carry a notepad at all times and to write information down to help them remember.

13. Make sure that your remarks are in the form of constructive criticism rather than criticism that could be perceived as personal, menacing, etc., (e.g., instead of saying, “You always make the same mistake,” say, “A better way to do it might be … . “).

14. Get the student to ask for help when they need it.

15. Minimize the emphasis on competition. Competitive learning activities may cause the student to omit appropriate steps in a task.

16. Create a timeline for finishing a project. Expect the student to meet each deadline to finish the project on time.

17. Jot down oral instructions. Cross each step off as it is finished.

18. Practice sequential memory learning activities daily. Practice those sequences that the student needs to memorize (e.g., essential telephone numbers, addresses, etc.).

19. Urge the student to create an understanding of themselves and their surroundings. Train the student to periodically step back and ask themselves, “Am I on-task and following the appropriate steps?” “What should I be doing now?”

20. Support the student in developing a flowchart of the steps appropriate to finish a task.

21. Consider using an education app to help the student enhance their memory. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

25 Powerful Tricks That Make Kids Grasp New Concepts Faster

Are you looking for powerful tricks that make kids grasp new concepts faster? If so, keep reading.

1. Find a list of word endings, keywords, etc., that the student will practice listening for when someone is speaking.

2. Provide oral questions and instructions that involve only one concept or step. As the student shows success, slowly increase the number of ideas or steps presented in oral questions and instructions.

3. Move the student away from other students who may interfere with their capacity and ability to pay attention to directions, explanations, and instructions.

4. Teach the student listening skills (e.g., listen carefully, write down essential points, ask for clarification, wait until all instructions are received before beginning, etc.).

5. Utilize demonstrations along with the presentation of information.

6. Scan all learning materials for new words. Utilize simple terms when possible. Teach new vocabulary and give practice through the application.

7. Provide concrete illustrations and hands-on experiences to reduce abstractions.

8. Show a new concept by relating it to previously presented information.

9. Develop or acquire manuals with simple definitions of technical vocabulary, simple vocabulary and sentence structure, step-by-step instructions, and diagrams or images.

10. Sequence known ideas with skills or ideas not learned to enable the recognition of relationships to new skills and ideas.

11. Spotlight the essential facts in reading content.

12. Rewrite instructions at an appropriate reading level for the student.

13. Show ideas using the student’s most efficient learning mode.

14. Give the student a written copy of the content presented orally.

15. Give the student an oral presentation of content if they have difficulty with the written presentation of ideas.

16. Record the presentation of new ideas. Let the student listen to it as often as appropriate.

17. Select a peer to repeat the presentation of ideas to the student when they do not understand.

18. Get the student to be a peer tutor to teach units of information they have learned to another student.

19. Create tests and exams for the student using the “Who, What, Where, On occasions where, How, and Why” format.

20. Get the student to listen and take notes for “Who, What, Where, On occasions where, How, and Why” when ideas are presented.

21. Get the student to take notes using semantic mapping methods.

22. Give the student the information they need (e.g., list of facts, a summary of essential points, outline of essential activities, etc.) to enable learning.

23. Show ideas following the (1) Who, (2) What, (3) Where, (4) On occasions where, (5) How, and (6) Why outline.

24. Use digital storytelling to help struggling students grasp new concepts.

25. Use gamification to help struggling students grasp new concepts.

21 Effective Memory Strategies for Special Needs Children

Are you looking for strategies to help your special education student improve their memory skills? If so, keep reading.

  1. Teach the student to identify main points, essential facts, etc.
  2. Teach the student to rely on resources in their surroundings to recall information (e.g., notes, textbooks, images, etc.).
  3. When the student is required to recall information, give auditory signals to help the student remember the information (e.g., keywords, a brief oral description to clue the student, etc.).
  4. Assess the meaningfulness of the content to the student. Knowledge acquisition is more likely to happen when the learning content is meaningful, and the student can relate to real experiences.
  5. Correlate the information being presented to the student’s prior learning experience s.
  6. Provide the student specific categories and have the student name as many things as possible within that category (e.g., objects, persons, places, etc.).
  7. Provide the student a sequence of words or images and have the student name the class to which they belong (e.g., objects, persons, places, etc.).
  8. Assist the student in employing memory aids to recall words (e.g., a name might be linked to another word; for example, “Mr. Green is a very colorful person.”).
  9. Provide the student a sequence of words describing objects, persons, places, etc., and have the student find the opposite of each word.
  10. Urge the student to play word games such as HANGMAN®, SCRABBLE®, Password™, etc.
  11. Get the student to finish “fill-in-the blank” sentences with appropriate words (e.g., objects, persons, places, etc.).
  12. Inform the student what to listen for when being given instructions, receiving information, etc.
  13. Assess the appropriateness of the memory learning activities to ascertain (a) if the task is too complicated, and (b) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.
  14. Tag objects, persons, places, etc., in their surroundings, to help the student recall their names.
  15. Make sure the student receives information from an assortment of sources (e.g., texts, discussions, films, slide presentations, etc.) to enable memory/recall.
  16. Teach the student listening skills (e.g., stop working, look at the person delivering questions and instructions, have appropriate note-taking learning materials, etc.).
  17. Teach the student instruction-following skills (e.g., stop doing other things, listen carefully, write down essential points, wait until all instructions are given, question any guidelines not grasped, etc.).
  18. Explain objects, persons, places, etc., and have the student name the things described.
  19. Get the student to record directions, explanations, instructions, lectures, etc. The student may replay the information as needed.
  20. Spotlight essential information the student reads (e.g., instructions, reading tasks, math word problems, etc.).
  21. Consider using an education app to help the student enhance their memory. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

15 Techniques to Help Kids with a Sporadic Memory

Are you looking for techniques to help students with a sporadic memory? If so, keep reading.

1. Get the student to follow a regular routine (schedule) of daily activities to create consistency in their behavior pattern.

2. Get the student to repeat to themselves information just heard to help them remember the essential facts.

3. Do not require the student to learn more information than they are capable of remembering at any time.

4. Provide the student a choice of answers (e.g., more than one possible answer, multiple-choice items on a worksheet, etc.) to enable their capacity and ability to recognize the correct answer.

5. Give reminders throughout the academic environment to help the student be more successful in remembering information (e.g., rules, lists, schedules, etc.).

6. Assist the student’s use of memory aids to recall words (e.g., a name might be linked to another word; for example, “Mr. Green is a very colorful person.”).

7. Give the student sufficient chances for repetition of information through various experiences to enable their memory.

8. Daily, examine those skills, ideas, tasks, etc., that have been previously introduced to help the student remember information previously presented.

9. Get the student to take notes when instructions are being given following the “What, How, Learning materials, and On occasions where” format.

10. Utilize daily drill learning activities to help the student memorize math facts, vocabulary words, etc.

11. Find the student’s most efficient learning mode. Utilize it continuously to enable the student’s comprehension (e.g., if the student fails to understand information or instructions orally, present them in written form; if the student has difficulty comprehending written information or instructions, present them orally; etc.).

12. Give the student chances to apply new skills or information to other situations (e.g., when they learn to count by fives, have them practice adding nickels; vocabulary words learned should be pointed out in reading selections; etc.).

13. Show instructions following the outline of (1) What, (2) How, (3) Learning materials, and (4) On occasions where.

14. Ask the student a question when they are most likely to be able to respond successfully.

15. Consider using an education app to help the student enhance their memory. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

15 Strategies to Help Learners with a Sporadic Memory

Are you looking for strategies to help students with a sporadic memory? If so, keep reading.

1. Get the student to record essential information that they should remember.

2. Show information orally if the student has difficulty remembering written information.

3. Get the student to highlight or summarize information that should be remembered.

4. Utilize concrete examples and experiences in sharing information with the student.

5. Teach the student to recognize main points, essential facts, etc.

6. Make sure the student has sufficient chances for repetition of information through various experiences to enable memory.

7. Show information to the student in the most concise manner possible.

8. Minimize distracting stimuli when the student is trying to recall essential information.

9. Teach the student to rely on resources in their surroundings to recall information (e.g., notes, textbooks, images, etc.).

10. Give auditory signals to help the student remember information (e.g., keywords, a brief oral description to clue the student, etc.).

11. Get the student to make notes, lists, etc., of essential information to carry with them at all times.

12. When the student is required to recall information, remind them of the situation in which the content was initially presented (e.g., “Remember yesterday when we talked about . . . ” “Remember when we were outside, and I told you about the . . . ” etc.).

13. Make the content important to the student. Remembering is more likely to happen when the content is important, and the student can relate the content to real experiences.

14. Correlate the information being presented to the student’s prior experiences.

15. Consider using an education app to help the student enhance their memory. Click here to view a list of apps that we recommend.

12 Ways to Help an Easily Confused Child

Are you looking for ways to help students who are easily confused? If so, keep reading.

1. Provide the student one task to perform at a time. Present the next task only when the student has successfully finished the prior task.

2. Separate at several points during the presentation of information to check the student’s comprehension.

3. Make sure the student is paying attention to the source of information (e.g., eye contact is being made, hands are free of learning materials, the student is looking at the task, etc.).

4. Give the student environmental signals and prompts designed to enable their success in the classroom (e.g., posted rules, schedule of daily activities, steps for performing a task, etc.).

5. Utilize images, diagrams, the smartboard, and gestures when delivering information.

6. Minimize the amount of information on a page (e.g., have less print to read, have fewer problems, isolate information that is presented to the student) if it causes visual distractions for the student.

7. Give the student shorter tasks. As the student shows success, slowly increase the length of tasks.

8. Find the student’s most efficient learning mode. Utilize it continuously to increase the student’s comprehension (e.g., if the student fails to understand information or instructions orally, present them in written form; if the student has difficulty comprehending written information or instructions, present them orally).

9. Make sure that oral instructions are delivered in a nonmenacing and compassionate manner (e.g., positive voice, facial expressions, and language such as, “Will you please . . . ” or “You need . . . ” rather than “You better. . .” or “If you don’t. . .”).

10. Make sure the student has mastery of ideas at one level before introducing a new skill level.

11. Utilize vocabulary that is within the student’s level of comprehension when delivering instructions, explanations, and information.

12. Provide information to the student on a one-to-one basis or use a peer tutor.

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